Technocracy And The Making of China

DengXiaoping.jpgIt was no mis­take of his­tory that China trans­formed from a Com­mu­nist dic­ta­tor­ship into a neo-authoritarian Technocracy.
In this regard, the influ­ence of the Tri­lat­eral Com­mis­sion, its mem­bers and poli­cies on the world stage can hardly be quan­ti­fied. The Com­mis­sion, founded by David Rock­e­feller and Zbig­niew Brzezinski in 1973, drew mem­ber­ship from North America, Europe and Japan. Out of approx­i­mately 300 mem­bers, only 86 were orig­i­nally from the United States, and yet they cor­po­rately devised and pushed poli­cies that suited the entire mem­ber­ship, and did so under a vir­tual cloak of invis­i­bility that lasts even into 2013.
Today, we reap the “ben­e­fits” of Tri­lat­eral manip­u­la­tion. The Euro­pean economy is trashed, Japan’s economy is still smol­dering from the mid-1990’s and the U.S. is much worse off today than in the late 1960’s. But, the polit­ical sys­tems of these coun­tries are not much better off than their economies. The fruit of decay in the United States is painfully evi­dent with a frac­tured and con­tentious politic that defies rec­on­cil­i­a­tion on even the most minor issues.

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Do the 1% Have Their Own #ShadowGovt? Is #TechnocracyRising?

Obama’s adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski, and David Rockefeller founded this group and it is most likely partly responsible for the economic collapse of the European Union and the coming war for energy in Eurasia.

The Trilateral Commission is a non-governmental, non-partisan discussion group founded by David Rockefeller in July 1973 to foster closer cooperation among the United States, Europe and Japan.
The Trilateral Commission
Trilateral.svg
Founder(s) David Rockefeller
Type Annual conference
Founded 1973
Location Washington, DC; Paris; Tokyo
Key people Joseph S. Nye, Jr. (North American chairman)

Mario Monti (European chairman)

Yotaro Kobayashi (Pacific Asian chairman)

Members More than 390
Website http://www.trilateral.org/

[edit] History

Sensing a profound discord between the nations of North America, Europe and Japan, the Trilateral Commission was founded to foster substantive political and economic dialogue across the world. To quote its founding declaration:
  • “Growing interdependence is a fact of life of the contemporary world. It transcends and influences national systems…While it is important to develop greater cooperation among all the countries of the world, Japan, Western Europe, and North America, in view of their great weight in the world economy and their massive relations with one another, bear a special responsibility for developing effective cooperation, both in their own interests and in those of the rest of the world.”
  • “To be effective in meeting common problems, Japan, Western Europe, and North America will have to consult and cooperate more closely, on the basis of equality, to develop and carry out coordinated policies on matters affecting their common interests…refrain from unilateral actions incompatible with their interdependence and from actions detrimental to other regions… [and] take advantage of existing international and regional organizations and further enhance their role.”
  • “The Commission hopes to play a creative role as a channel of free exchange of opinions with other countries and regions. Further progress of the developing countries and greater improvement of East-West relations will be a major concern.”[1]
Zbigniew Brzezinski, a professor at Columbia University and a Rockefeller advisor who was a specialist on international affairs, left his post to organize the group along with:
  • Henry D. Owen (a Foreign Policy Studies Director with the Brookings Institution)
  • Robert R. Bowie (of the Foreign Policy Association and Director of the Harvard Center for International Affairs)
  • Gerard C. Smith (Salt I negotiator, Rockefeller in-law, and its first North American Chairman)
Other founding members included Alan Greenspan and Paul Volcker, both later heads of the Federal Reserve system.
The Trilateral Commission initiated its biannual meetings schedule in October 1973 in Tokyo. In May 1976, the first plenary meeting of all of the Commission’s regional groups took place in Kyoto. It was through these early meetings that the group affected its most profound influence, the integration of Japan into the global political conversation. Before these exchanges, the country was much more isolated on the international stage.[1] Since its founding, the discussion group has produced an official journal called Trialogue.

[edit] Membership

Membership is divided into numbers proportionate to each of the think tank’s three regional areas. The North American continent is represented by 120 members (20 Canadian, 13 Mexican and 87 U.S. citizens). The European group has reached its limit of 170 members from almost every country on the continent; the ceilings for individual countries are 20 for Germany, 18 for France, Italy and the United Kingdom, 12 for Spain and 1–6 for the rest. At first, Asia and Oceania were represented only by Japan. However, in 2000 the Japanese group of 85 members expanded itself, becoming the Pacific Asia group, composed of 117 members: 75 Japanese, 11 South Koreans, 7 Australian and New Zealand citizens, and 15 members from the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand). The Pacific Asia group also included 9 members from China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Currently, the Trilateral Commission claims “more than 100” Pacific Asian members.[1]
While Trilateral Commission bylaws exclude persons holding public office from membership,[2] the think tank draws its participants from political, business, and academic worlds. The group is chaired by three individuals, one from each of the regions represented. The current chairmen are former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs Joseph S. Nye, Jr., President of Bocconi University, Milan, Mario Monti, and Chief Corporate Adviser, Fuji Xerox Company, Ltd. Yotaro Kobayashi.[3]

[edit] Criticisms

Not unlike reactions to the United Nations or other organizations created to foster international cooperation, a number of prominent thinkers and politicians have criticized the Trilateral Commission as encroaching on national sovereignty. On the right, in his book With No Apologies, former conservative Republican Senator Barry Goldwater lambasted the discussion group by suggesting it was “a skillful, coordinated effort to seize control and consolidate the four centers of power: political, monetary, intellectual, and ecclesiastical…[in] the creation of a worldwide economic power superior to the political governments of the nation-states involved.”[4] On the left, linguist Noam Chomsky criticized a report issued by the Commission called The Crisis of Democracy for suggesting that there was an “excess of democracy” in the 1960s and defending “the ideology of the liberal wing of the state capitalist ruling elite”. Chomsky also argues that the group had an undue influence in the administration of Jimmy Carter.[5]

[edit] Conspiracy theories

While the Trilateral Commission is only one of many similar think tanks on the right and left, many notable conspiracy theorists believe the organization to be a central plotter of a world government or synarchy. As documented by journalist Jonathan Kay, 9/11 conspiracy theorist Luke Rudkowski gained notoriety in April 2007 by interrupting a lecture by former Trilateral Commission director Zbigniew Brzezinski and accusing the organization and a few others of having orchestrated the attacks of September 11th to initiate a new world order.[6] Conservative and right-wing groups such as the John Birch Society and conspiracy theorists such as American paleoconservative Alex Jones also regularly tout this idea.[7][8]

Read more at en.wikipedia.org