HEMP BIOMASS FOR ENERGY

HEMP BIOMASS FOR ENERGY
RV3
Tim Castleman
© Fuel and Fiber Company, 2001, 2006


Table of Contents

Table of Contents_____________________________________________________________ 2
Introduction_________________________________________________________________ 3
Ways biomass can be used for energy production____________________________________ 3
Burning:_________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Oils:____________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Conversion of cellulose to alcohol:____________________________________________________________ 4
About Hemp_________________________________________________________________ 5
Hemp seed oil for Bio Diesel____________________________________________________ 5
Production of oil__________________________________________________________________________ 5
Production of Bio-Diesel____________________________________________________________________ 5
Hemp Cellulose for Ethanol_____________________________________________________ 6
Forest Thinning and Slash, Mill Wastes________________________________________________________ 6
Agricultural Waste_________________________________________________________________________ 7
MSW (Municipal Solid Waste)______________________________________________________________ 7
Dedicated Energy Crops_____________________________________________________________________ 8
Barriers__________________________________________________________________________________ 8
Benefits_________________________________________________________________________________ 8
The Fuel and Fiber Company Method_____________________________________________ 9
Hemp Biomass Production Model Using the Fuel and Fiber Company Method_______________________ 10
Economic Impact____________________________________________________________ 11
Employment_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Construction_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Related agricultural activities________________________________________________________________ 11
Environmental Impact________________________________________________________ 11
Endnotes & References_______________________________________________________ 12


Hemp as Biomass for Energy

Introduction

Hemp advocates claim industrial hemp would be a good source of biomass to help address our energy needs. Since the oil crisis in the early seventies much work has been accomplished in the area of energy production using biomass. Biomass is any plant or tree matter in large quantity. These decades of research have lead to the discovery of several ways to convert biomass into energy and other useful products.
Questions of biomass suitability as compared to other “green” sources of energy are the subject of numerous studies and are not addressed here. Other questions concerning detailed economic and environmental impact, use of GMO’s, and agronomy are also outside the scope of this analysis.
This paper does attempt to explore the options available, and outlines some of the barriers and opportunities regarding them.

Ways biomass can be used for energy production

Burning:

·      Co-fired with coal to reduce emissions and offset a fraction of coal use
·      Burned to produce electricity
·      Pelletized to heat structures
·      Made or cut into logs for heating
Biomass to be burned is typically valued at $30-50 per ton, which makes whole stalk hemp as biomass to be burned impractical due to the high value of its bast fiber. One exception may be found in consideration of the latest gasification technologies used on local small scale and in remote rural applications.
·      Gasification (Pyrrolysis)
Gasification uses high heat to convert biomass into “SynGas” (synthetic gas) and low grade fuel oil which has an energy content of about 40% that of petroleum diesel. By products are mostly “Char” and ash. This technology is readily available commercially in several forms and could be a viable option according to local environmental and economic conditions. Beginning in 1999, Community Power Corporation[i] joined with the US National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) and Shell Renewables, Ltd. to design and develop a new generation of small modular biopower systems. The first prototype SMB system rated at 15 kWe was deployed in the village of Alaminos in the Philippines in early 2001. The fully automated system can use a variety of biomass fuels to generate electricity, shaft power and heat.

Oils:

·      Vegetable, seed and plant oil used “as-is” in diesel engines
·      Biodiesel – vegetable oil converted by chemical reaction
·      Converted into high-quality non-toxic lubricants
There are a number of plants high in oils, and many processes that produce vegetable oil as a waste product. These include soy, corn, coconut, palm, canola, rapeseed, and a number of other promising species. Any of these oils can be converted to biodiesel as described later, with a feedstock cost of $0 + per gallon.

Conversion of cellulose to alcohol:

·      Hydrolysis (Enzymatic & Acid)
Conversion of cellulose to fermentable glucose holds the greatest promise from both a production and feedstock supply standpoint. DOE (NREL) and a number of Universities and private enterprise have been developing this technology and achieved a number of milestones. Production estimates of 80 to 130 gallons per ton of biomass make this technology very attractive.
·      Anaerobic digester (Methane)
Anaerobic digestion is used to capture methane from any waste material. It is confirmed technology under commercialization utilizing landfill gases, wastewater treatment system gases, agricultural wastes from several other sources, particularly hog and cattle manure. It is well suited for distributed power generation when co-located with electrical generation equipment. For example, Corporation for Future Resources[ii] and Minusa Coffee Company, Ltd., located near Itaipé, Minas Gerais, Brazil, have teamed to construct an anaerobic fermentation digestion facility at Minusa’s coffee operation. The 600 cubic meter digester is designed to continuously produce methane rich gas, to be used for coffee drying and electric power production, as well as nitrogen-rich anaerobic organic fertilizer.

CFR/Minusa Anaerobic digester in Brazil.
The digester is constructed from native granite blocks quarried at the Minusa site.

 

File written by Adobe Photoshop® 4.0

This technology may be attractive in some cases when co-located with a hemp fiber processing facility or in remote locations to provide local power generation.


About Hemp

Industrial hemp can be grown in most climates and on marginal soils. It requires little or no herbicide and no pesticide, and uses less water than cotton. Measurements at Ridgetown College indicate the crop needs 300-400 mm (10-13 in.) of rainfall equivalent. Yields will vary according to local conditions and will range from 1.5 to 6 dry tons of biomass per acre[iii]. California’s rich croplands and growing environment are expected to increase yields by 20% over Canadian results, which will average at least 3.9 bone dry tons per acre.

Hemp seed oil for Bio Diesel

Production of oil

Grown for oilseed, Canadian grower’s yields average 1 tonne/hectare, or about 400 lbs. per acre. Cannabis seed contains about 28% oil (112 lbs.), or about 15 gallons per acre. Production costs using these figures would be about $35 per gallon. Some varieties are reported[iv] to yield as much as 38% oil, and a record 2,000 lbs. per acre was recorded in 1999. At this rate, 760 lbs.of oil per acre would result in about 100 gallons of oil, with production costs totaling about $5.20 gallon. This oil could be used as-is in modified diesel engines, or be converted to biodiesel using a relatively simple, automated process. Several systems are under development worldwide designed to produce biodiesel on a small scale, such as on farms using “homegrown” oil crops.

Production of Bio-Diesel

Basically methyl esters, or biodiesel, as it is commonly called, can be made from any oil or fat, including hemp seed oil. The reaction requires only oil, an alcohol (usually methanol) and a catalyst (usually sodium hydroxide [NaOH, or drain cleaner]). The reaction produces only biodiesel and a smaller amount of glycerol or glycerin.

The costs of materials needed for the reaction are the costs associated with production of hemp seed oil, the cost of methanol and the NaOH. In the instances where waste vegetable oil, or WVO, is used, the cost for oil is of course, free. Typically methanol costs about $2 per gallon and NaOH costs about $5 per 500g or about $0.01 per gram. For a typical 17 gallon batch of biodiesel, you’d start with 14 gallons of hemp seed oil; add to that 15% by volume of alcohol (or 2.1 gallons) and about 500g of NaOH. The process takes about 2 hours to complete and requires about 2000 watts of energy. That works out to about 2kw/hr or about $0.10 of energy (assuming $0.05 per kw/hr). So the total cost per gallon of biodiesel is $? (oil) + 2.1 x $2 (methanol) + $5 (NaOH) + $0.10 (energy) / 14 gallons = $0.66 per gallon, plus the cost of the oil.[v] Other costs may include sales, transportation, maintenance, depreciation, insurance and labor.


Hemp Cellulose for Ethanol

Another approach will involve conversion of cellulose to ethanol, which can be done in several ways including gasification, acid hydrolysis and a technology utilizing engineered enzymes to convert cellulose to glucose, which is then fermented to make alcohol. Still another approach using enzymes will convert cellulose directly to alcohol, which leads to substantial process cost savings.
Current costs associated with these conversion processes are about $1.37[vi] per gallon of fuel produced, plus the cost of the feedstock. Of this $1.37, enzyme costs are about $0.50 per gallon; current research efforts are directed toward reduction of this amount to $0.05 per gallon. There is a Federal tax credit of $0.54 per gallon and a number of other various incentives available. Conversion rates range from a low of 25-30 gallons per ton of biomass to 100 gallons per ton using the latest technology.
In 1998 the total California gasoline demand was 14 billion gallons. When ethanol is used to replace MTBE as an oxygenate, this will create California demand in excess of 700 million gallons per year. MTBE is to be phased out of use by 2003 according to State law.
In this case we can consider biomass production from a much broader perspective. Sources of feedstock under consideration for these processes are:

We will address these in turn and show why a dedicated energy crop holds important potential for ethanol production in California, why hemp is a good candidate as a dedicated energy crop, and how it may represent the fastest track to meeting 34% of California’s upcoming ethanol market demand of at least 580-750 million gallons per year.[vii]

Forest Thinning and Slash, Mill Wastes

A 1999 California Energy Commission biomass resource assessment estimated 13.8 million bone dry tons (5.5 Mill, 4.5 Slash & 3.8 thinnings) are available in California.
If practiced within State & Federal regulations, use of this source can have significant beneficial effects. Removal of excess biomass from forests reduces the frequency & intensity of fires, helping control the spread of diseases, and contributes to overall forest health. At 59 – 66 gallons per ton, this could supply as much as 900 million gallons per year.
One proposed California project, Collins Pine’s Chester Mill, which will contribute 20 MGY and be co-located with an existing biomass-powered 12 MW electric generator; yet, there is significant resistance to such uses by several prominent environmental groups, and for good reason – this could eventually lead to widespread destruction of forest habitat by overzealous energy companies willing to disregard the environment in the name of national energy security. Barriers also include harvest cost and capabilities as some slash & thinnings are extremely difficult to access, and the high lignin content of these materials.
If 25% of the available material were used, about 200 million gallons per year could be produced.

Agricultural Waste

In California over 500,000 acres of rice are grown each year. Each acre produces 1-2.5 tons of rice straw which have been until now burned. Alternative methods of disposal are needed, and conversion to ethanol has been under development for several years. There are currently two projects underway proposing to use rice straw: one in California (Gridley) and one in Jennings, LA. If the Gridley project is fully implemented, it will add 25 million gallons of production to California’s already-thin 9 million gallons per year. Barriers include collection costs and the high silica content (13%) of rice straw.
Other agricultural wastes include orchard trimmings, walnut and almond shells, and food processing wastes, for a total of about 700 MGY potential if ALL agricultural wastes were used. This is, of course, impractical, as some must be returned to the soil somehow, plus collection and transport costs will have an effect on viability of a particular waste product. Agricultural waste has the potential to satisfy a significant share of demand, with many factors to be considered when proposing a bio-refinery based on any feedstock, which are determined by full life-cycle analysis.
If 25% of the available material were used, about 175 million gallons per year could be produced.

MSW (Municipal Solid Waste)

Though about 60% of the waste stream is cellulosic material such as yard trimmings, urban waste and paper, this source is not considered a viable option for a number of reasons; these include existing industries that recycle materials and the landfill’s use of green waste as “Alternative Daily Cover” (ADC). Co-location of ethanol production is possible, but only up to about 10 MGY of production. When capital investment is considered, it is generally considered most economical to build larger capacity facilities.
The future of MSW being used for ethanol conversion does not look good. At best, 100 MGY of capacity may eventually come online, but it will be an uphill struggle to compete with higher value uses already in place.



Dedicated Energy Crops

There are 28 million acres of agricultural land in California, of which 10 million acres are established cropland. If 10% of this cropland (1 million acres) were dedicated to production of hemp as an energy and fiber crop, we could produce 150-500 million gallons of ethanol per year.
Greater estimates would result from expanding the analysis to include use of agricultural lands not currently applied to crop production as well as additional land not currently devoted to agriculture. A California Department of Food and Agriculture estimate suggests that each 1 million acres of crop production, occupying roughly 1% of the state’s total land area, would supply the ethanol equivalent of about 3% of California’s current gasoline demand.[viii]

Barriers

A barrier to the development of a cellulose-to-ethanol industry is availability, consistency and make-up, and location of feedstock. Dedicated crops, such as switchgrass[ix], resolve these problems. Cannabis hemp will enhance business opportunities because we can “tailor” the cannabis plant fractions to satisfy multiple end uses such as high value composites, fine paper, nitrogen rich fertilizer, CO2 , medicines, plastics, fabrics and polymers – just a portion of the many possible end uses.

Benefits

Benefits of a dedicated energy crop include consistency of feedstock supply, enhanced co-product opportunities, and increased carbon sequestration. It is commonly held that agricultural industries must focus on multiple value-added products from the various fractions of plants. This value-adding enhances rural development by providing jobs and facilities for value-adding operations. Hemp[x] lends itself to this in a unique way due to the high value of its bast fiber. Market prices for well-cleaned, composite-grade natural fiber are about 55¢ per pound ($1,100 ton); lower value uses, such as in some paper-making, bring $400-$700 per ton, while other value-adding options, such as pulping for fine papers[xi], could increase the value of the fiber to $2,500 per ton.

The Fuel and Fiber Company Method

The Fuel and Fiber Company Method[xii] employs a mechanical separation step to extract the high-value bast fiber[xiii] as a first step in processing. The remaining core material is to undergo conversion to alcohol and other co-products. There is no waste stream and the system will provide a net carbon reduction due to increased biomass production. Conversion efficiency of hemp core is relative to the lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose content and method used. The following table lists some materials often cited as potential sources of biomass and their chemical make-up. A challenge is conversion of hemicellulose to glucose; yet this challenge has been met recently by Genencor, Arkenol, Iogen, and others. These technologies provide conversion of hemicellulose and cellulose fractions to glucose using cellulase enzymes or acid.
Hemp
Cellulose
Hemicellulose
Lignin
Bast
64.8 %
7.7%
4.3 %
Core
34.5 %
17.8%
20.8 %
Soft Pine
44%
26%
27.8%
Spruce
42%
27%
28.6%
Wheat Straw
34%
27.6%
18%
Rice Straw
32.1%
24.0%
12.5%
Corn Stover
28%
28%
11%
Switchgrass
32.5%
26.4%
17.8%
Chemical composition of Industrial Hemp as compared to other plant matter
Lignin has long been viewed as a problem in the processing of fiber, and detailed studies have revealed numerous methods of removal and degradation; commonly it is burned for process heat and power generation. Advances in gasification and turbine technologies enable on-site power and heat generation, and should be seriously considered in any full-scale proposal. Additionally, by full chemical assay and careful market evaluation numerous co-product and value-adding opportunities exist. Such assay should include a NIRS (Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy) analysis, with as many varieties and conditions of material as can be gathered.
Reductions in lignin achieved by cultivation and harvest techniques, germplasm development and custom enzyme development will optimize processing output and efficiency. Incremental advances in system efficiencies related to these production improvements create a significant financial incentive for investors.
The Fuel and Fiber Company Renewable Resource System will process 300,000 to 600,000 tons of biomass per year, per facility; 25% to 35% of this will be high-value grades of core-free bast fiber. The remaining 65% to 75% of biomass will be used for the conversion process. Each facility will process input from 60,000 to 170,000 acres. Outputs are: Ethanol: 10-25 MGY (Million Gallons per Year), Fiber: 67,000 to 167,000 tons per year, and other co-products; fertilizer, animal feed, etc. to be determined. Hemp production will average 3.9 tons per acre with average costs of $520 per acre.

 

Hemp Biomass Production Model Using the Fuel and Fiber Company Method[xiv]

Min
Max
Average
Improve 20%
Totals
Sell 1
Sell 2
Total 1
Total 2
Tons per Acre
1.5
5
3.25
0.65
3.9
Lbs. Bast
(Separated 90-94%)
750
2500
1625
325
1950
0.35
0.55
$682.50
$1,072.50
Lbs. Hurd
2250
7500
4875
975
5850
Gallons Per Ton
20
80
50
$2.00
$3.00
Gallons Per Acre
146
292.5
438.8
Ethanol costs
Per Gallon
0.92
1.37
1.145
167.46
167.46
Ethanol profit
$125.04
$271.29
Gross
$807.54
$1,343.79
Production Costs
Per Acre
424
617
520.5
$520.50
$520.50
Separation costs
Per Ton
41.54
75.68
58.61
$228.58
$228.58
Costs
$749.08
$749.08
Profit
$58.46
$594.71
Administrative & License %
2
$16.15
$26.88
NET
$42.31
$567.84
Capacity
Acres
Tons Fiber
10 MGY Facility
68,376
66,667
Annual
$2,893,256
$38,826,590
25 MGY Facility
170,940
166,667
Profits
$7,233,141
$97,066,474
Total Admin & License
$1,104,333
$4,594,167
Capital costs not included. Estimated capital costs are $135 to $150 million per facility, plus crop payments. To add a pulping operation will require an additional $100 million and adds $117 per ton of fiber processed for pulp, which has a market value of up to $2,500 per ton. The most conservative estimates possible were used for this study. A full-scale feasibility study is needed to validate assumptions and projections. An additional $35 per ton environmental impact benefit should also be factored into future projections[xv].


Economic Impact

Employment

Employment for hemp production, calculated at one worker per 40 acres farmed[xvi], results in a total of 1,700 to 4,275 new jobs, if 10% of California’s cropland is put into production of cannabis hemp. These jobs are created across all traditional agricultural employment sectors, upon full development of the system.
The processing plants will also create new jobs in these areas[xvii]:
·      Administrative & Sales – 15 to 25 per facility
·      Research & Development – 25 to 50 statewide
·      Engineering & Technical – 75 to 100 statewide
·      Construction & Maintenance – 150 to 300 statewide
·      Transportation & Material Handling – 10 to 20 per facility
·      General Labor – 25 to 50 per facility

Construction

Each facility will incur $100-300 million in construction costs. Much of the equipment and labor will be procured locally, creating new jobs and opportunities for entrepreneurs to provide equipment and services to this new industry.

Related agricultural activities

At an average cost of $520 per acre, returns to farmers will range from $50-$500 profit per acre. Used in rotation with other crops, hemp can help reduce herbicide use resulting in savings to the farmer on production of crops other than hemp.

Environmental Impact

There are a great number of environmental impacts to be considered, including;
·      Water use. Agricultural operations & processing will consume hundreds of millions of gallons.
·      Large mono-crop systems have been problematic. Though hemp lends itself well to mono-cropping, effective & feasible rotation schemes must be devised.
·      Genetically Modified Organisms – Are key to efficient conversions but may pose a great threat to life. This is an issue that must be handled with complete transparency & integrity.
·      Waste streams generated – Though expected to be low, a detailed accounting must be made and addressed.
·      Creation of “Carbon Sink” to absorb carbon
·      Improved land and water management
·      In-State fuel production – reducing transport costs and associated effects
·      Reduction in emissions (Continued use of RFG)
·      $35 per acre total environmental benefit



[i] Community Power Corporation, 8420 S. Continental Divide Road, Littleton, CO 80127
[ii] Corporation For Future Resources, !909 Chowkeebin Court, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
[iii] Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs FactSheet “Growing Industrial Hemp in Ontario” 08/00
[iv] A Brief Analysis of the Characteristics of Industrial Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) Seed Grown in Northern Ontario in 1998. May 19, 1999 Herb A. Hinz, Undergraduate Thesis, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario
[v] IAN S. WATSON, AIA BioDiesel Expert
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
[vi] CIFAR Conference XIV, “Cracking the Nut: Bioprocessing Lignocellulose to Renewable Products and Energy”, June 4, 2001
[vii] California Energy Commission report “COSTS AND BENEFITS OF A BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PRODUCTION INDUSTRY IN CALIFORNIA”, March, 2001
[viii] California Energy Commission report “EVALUATION OF BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL FUEL POTENTIAL IN CALIFORNIA”, December, 1999 pg iv 4-5
[ix] Switchgrass is the leading candidate under consideration by DOE. Numerous studies are available upon request.
[x] Cannabis Sativa, commonly know as “hemp” is included in a list of potential field crops considered as Candidate Energy Crops in the December 1999 California Energy Commission report “EVALUATION OF BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL FUEL POTENTIAL IN CALIFORNIA” pg. iv-3
[xi] Hemp Pulp and Paper Production Gertjan van Roekel jr.
ATO-DLO Agrotechnology, P.O.box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands
Van Roekel, G J, 1994. Hemp pulp and paper production. Journal of the International Hemp Association 1: 12-14.
[xii] Fuel and Fiber Company was formed to promote a renewable resource system using fibrous crops such as hemp and kenaf to produce high-value natural fiber, ethanol and other co-products. www.FuelandFiber.com
[xiii] All of the hemp fibre produced and sold by Hempline (www.hempline.com) is made from hemp grown without pesticides and processed without chemicals. The fibre is a uniform natural golden colour typical of field retted stalks. The fibre has a moisture regain of 12% and excellent fibre tenacity. The fibre is pressed into high compression bales to minimize transportation costs.
The fibre is available in 40ft. and 20 ft. containers, truckloads or by the bale and shipped internationally. Samples of the fibre are available for trials upon request. The pricing varies based on the fibre grade, and is comparable or more cost effective than many natural and synthetic fibres.
Hempline primary hemp fibre comes in the following grades:
Ultra clean Grade Fibre
·       99.9% clean of core fibre Value: .55 + lb.
·       Dust extracted
·       Available in staples lengths between 1/2″ to 6″ and sliver.
·       Well opened with a typical staple denier of between 15 to 65
·       Applications include: nonwovens, composites, textiles, any where that a very clean well opened fibre with uniform staple length is needed.
Composite Grade Fibre
·       96 – 99% clean of core fibre Value: .35 – .55 lb.
·       Dust extracted
·       Available in staples lengths between 1″ to 6″.
·       Fairly well opened with a typical staple denier of between 50 to 125
·       Applications include: a range of composites such as automotive, furniture and construction; nonwovens; insulation.
General Purpose Grade Fibre Value: .20 lb.
·       50 – 75% clean of core fibre
·       Staple lengths vary between 1″ to 6″. Can be modified according to your requirements
·       Applications include: fibre for hydro mulch; cement and plaster filler; insulation; geo-matting.
Core fibre
For animal bedding and garden mulch, under the HempChips(tm) brand, is available in 3.2 cu. ft. (90 L) compressed bags through retail outlets and direct-to-stable in truckload quantities.
[xiv] Based on 20% improvement over Canadian production per Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Factsheet “Growing Industrial Hemp in Ontario”, 08/00
[xv] DOE calculation – See Chariton Valley project reports.
[xvi] California Agricultural Employment Report
[xvii] Estimate only. Actual numbers need to be discovered and confirmed.

HEMP BIOMASS FOR ENERGY with New Farm Bill

HEMP BIOMASS FOR ENERGY
RV3
Tim Castleman
© Fuel and Fiber Company, 2001, 2006


Table of Contents

Table of Contents_____________________________________________________________ 2
Introduction_________________________________________________________________ 3
Ways biomass can be used for energy production____________________________________ 3
Burning:_________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Oils:____________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Conversion of cellulose to alcohol:____________________________________________________________ 4
About Hemp_________________________________________________________________ 5
Hemp seed oil for Bio Diesel____________________________________________________ 5
Production of oil__________________________________________________________________________ 5
Production of Bio-Diesel____________________________________________________________________ 5
Hemp Cellulose for Ethanol_____________________________________________________ 6
Forest Thinning and Slash, Mill Wastes________________________________________________________ 6
Agricultural Waste_________________________________________________________________________ 7
MSW (Municipal Solid Waste)______________________________________________________________ 7
Dedicated Energy Crops_____________________________________________________________________ 8
Barriers__________________________________________________________________________________ 8
Benefits_________________________________________________________________________________ 8
The Fuel and Fiber Company Method_____________________________________________ 9
Hemp Biomass Production Model Using the Fuel and Fiber Company Method_______________________ 10
Economic Impact____________________________________________________________ 11
Employment_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Construction_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Related agricultural activities________________________________________________________________ 11
Environmental Impact________________________________________________________ 11
Endnotes & References_______________________________________________________ 12


Hemp as Biomass for Energy

Introduction

Hemp advocates claim industrial hemp would be a good source of biomass to help address our energy needs. Since the oil crisis in the early seventies much work has been accomplished in the area of energy production using biomass. Biomass is any plant or tree matter in large quantity. These decades of research have lead to the discovery of several ways to convert biomass into energy and other useful products.
Questions of biomass suitability as compared to other “green” sources of energy are the subject of numerous studies and are not addressed here. Other questions concerning detailed economic and environmental impact, use of GMO’s, and agronomy are also outside the scope of this analysis.
This paper does attempt to explore the options available, and outlines some of the barriers and opportunities regarding them.

Ways biomass can be used for energy production

Burning:

·      Co-fired with coal to reduce emissions and offset a fraction of coal use
·      Burned to produce electricity
·      Pelletized to heat structures
·      Made or cut into logs for heating
Biomass to be burned is typically valued at $30-50 per ton, which makes whole stalk hemp as biomass to be burned impractical due to the high value of its bast fiber. One exception may be found in consideration of the latest gasification technologies used on local small scale and in remote rural applications.
·      Gasification (Pyrrolysis)
Gasification uses high heat to convert biomass into “SynGas” (synthetic gas) and low grade fuel oil which has an energy content of about 40% that of petroleum diesel. By products are mostly “Char” and ash. This technology is readily available commercially in several forms and could be a viable option according to local environmental and economic conditions. Beginning in 1999, Community Power Corporation[i] joined with the US National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) and Shell Renewables, Ltd. to design and develop a new generation of small modular biopower systems. The first prototype SMB system rated at 15 kWe was deployed in the village of Alaminos in the Philippines in early 2001. The fully automated system can use a variety of biomass fuels to generate electricity, shaft power and heat.

Oils:

·      Vegetable, seed and plant oil used “as-is” in diesel engines
·      Biodiesel – vegetable oil converted by chemical reaction
·      Converted into high-quality non-toxic lubricants
There are a number of plants high in oils, and many processes that produce vegetable oil as a waste product. These include soy, corn, coconut, palm, canola, rapeseed, and a number of other promising species. Any of these oils can be converted to biodiesel as described later, with a feedstock cost of $0 + per gallon.

Conversion of cellulose to alcohol:

·      Hydrolysis (Enzymatic & Acid)
Conversion of cellulose to fermentable glucose holds the greatest promise from both a production and feedstock supply standpoint. DOE (NREL) and a number of Universities and private enterprise have been developing this technology and achieved a number of milestones. Production estimates of 80 to 130 gallons per ton of biomass make this technology very attractive.
·      Anaerobic digester (Methane)
Anaerobic digestion is used to capture methane from any waste material. It is confirmed technology under commercialization utilizing landfill gases, wastewater treatment system gases, agricultural wastes from several other sources, particularly hog and cattle manure. It is well suited for distributed power generation when co-located with electrical generation equipment. For example, Corporation for Future Resources[ii] and Minusa Coffee Company, Ltd., located near Itaipé, Minas Gerais, Brazil, have teamed to construct an anaerobic fermentation digestion facility at Minusa’s coffee operation. The 600 cubic meter digester is designed to continuously produce methane rich gas, to be used for coffee drying and electric power production, as well as nitrogen-rich anaerobic organic fertilizer.

CFR/Minusa Anaerobic digester in Brazil.
The digester is constructed from native granite blocks quarried at the Minusa site.

 

File written by Adobe Photoshop® 4.0

This technology may be attractive in some cases when co-located with a hemp fiber processing facility or in remote locations to provide local power generation.


About Hemp

Industrial hemp can be grown in most climates and on marginal soils. It requires little or no herbicide and no pesticide, and uses less water than cotton. Measurements at Ridgetown College indicate the crop needs 300-400 mm (10-13 in.) of rainfall equivalent. Yields will vary according to local conditions and will range from 1.5 to 6 dry tons of biomass per acre[iii]. California’s rich croplands and growing environment are expected to increase yields by 20% over Canadian results, which will average at least 3.9 bone dry tons per acre.

Hemp seed oil for Bio Diesel

Production of oil

Grown for oilseed, Canadian grower’s yields average 1 tonne/hectare, or about 400 lbs. per acre. Cannabis seed contains about 28% oil (112 lbs.), or about 15 gallons per acre. Production costs using these figures would be about $35 per gallon. Some varieties are reported[iv] to yield as much as 38% oil, and a record 2,000 lbs. per acre was recorded in 1999. At this rate, 760 lbs.of oil per acre would result in about 100 gallons of oil, with production costs totaling about $5.20 gallon. This oil could be used as-is in modified diesel engines, or be converted to biodiesel using a relatively simple, automated process. Several systems are under development worldwide designed to produce biodiesel on a small scale, such as on farms using “homegrown” oil crops.

Production of Bio-Diesel

Basically methyl esters, or biodiesel, as it is commonly called, can be made from any oil or fat, including hemp seed oil. The reaction requires only oil, an alcohol (usually methanol) and a catalyst (usually sodium hydroxide [NaOH, or drain cleaner]). The reaction produces only biodiesel and a smaller amount of glycerol or glycerin.

The costs of materials needed for the reaction are the costs associated with production of hemp seed oil, the cost of methanol and the NaOH. In the instances where waste vegetable oil, or WVO, is used, the cost for oil is of course, free. Typically methanol costs about $2 per gallon and NaOH costs about $5 per 500g or about $0.01 per gram. For a typical 17 gallon batch of biodiesel, you’d start with 14 gallons of hemp seed oil; add to that 15% by volume of alcohol (or 2.1 gallons) and about 500g of NaOH. The process takes about 2 hours to complete and requires about 2000 watts of energy. That works out to about 2kw/hr or about $0.10 of energy (assuming $0.05 per kw/hr). So the total cost per gallon of biodiesel is $? (oil) + 2.1 x $2 (methanol) + $5 (NaOH) + $0.10 (energy) / 14 gallons = $0.66 per gallon, plus the cost of the oil.[v] Other costs may include sales, transportation, maintenance, depreciation, insurance and labor.


Hemp Cellulose for Ethanol

Another approach will involve conversion of cellulose to ethanol, which can be done in several ways including gasification, acid hydrolysis and a technology utilizing engineered enzymes to convert cellulose to glucose, which is then fermented to make alcohol. Still another approach using enzymes will convert cellulose directly to alcohol, which leads to substantial process cost savings.
Current costs associated with these conversion processes are about $1.37[vi] per gallon of fuel produced, plus the cost of the feedstock. Of this $1.37, enzyme costs are about $0.50 per gallon; current research efforts are directed toward reduction of this amount to $0.05 per gallon. There is a Federal tax credit of $0.54 per gallon and a number of other various incentives available. Conversion rates range from a low of 25-30 gallons per ton of biomass to 100 gallons per ton using the latest technology.
In 1998 the total California gasoline demand was 14 billion gallons. When ethanol is used to replace MTBE as an oxygenate, this will create California demand in excess of 700 million gallons per year. MTBE is to be phased out of use by 2003 according to State law.
In this case we can consider biomass production from a much broader perspective. Sources of feedstock under consideration for these processes are:

We will address these in turn and show why a dedicated energy crop holds important potential for ethanol production in California, why hemp is a good candidate as a dedicated energy crop, and how it may represent the fastest track to meeting 34% of California’s upcoming ethanol market demand of at least 580-750 million gallons per year.[vii]

Forest Thinning and Slash, Mill Wastes

A 1999 California Energy Commission biomass resource assessment estimated 13.8 million bone dry tons (5.5 Mill, 4.5 Slash & 3.8 thinnings) are available in California.
If practiced within State & Federal regulations, use of this source can have significant beneficial effects. Removal of excess biomass from forests reduces the frequency & intensity of fires, helping control the spread of diseases, and contributes to overall forest health. At 59 – 66 gallons per ton, this could supply as much as 900 million gallons per year.
One proposed California project, Collins Pine’s Chester Mill, which will contribute 20 MGY and be co-located with an existing biomass-powered 12 MW electric generator; yet, there is significant resistance to such uses by several prominent environmental groups, and for good reason – this could eventually lead to widespread destruction of forest habitat by overzealous energy companies willing to disregard the environment in the name of national energy security. Barriers also include harvest cost and capabilities as some slash & thinnings are extremely difficult to access, and the high lignin content of these materials.
If 25% of the available material were used, about 200 million gallons per year could be produced.

Agricultural Waste

In California over 500,000 acres of rice are grown each year. Each acre produces 1-2.5 tons of rice straw which have been until now burned. Alternative methods of disposal are needed, and conversion to ethanol has been under development for several years. There are currently two projects underway proposing to use rice straw: one in California (Gridley) and one in Jennings, LA. If the Gridley project is fully implemented, it will add 25 million gallons of production to California’s already-thin 9 million gallons per year. Barriers include collection costs and the high silica content (13%) of rice straw.
Other agricultural wastes include orchard trimmings, walnut and almond shells, and food processing wastes, for a total of about 700 MGY potential if ALL agricultural wastes were used. This is, of course, impractical, as some must be returned to the soil somehow, plus collection and transport costs will have an effect on viability of a particular waste product. Agricultural waste has the potential to satisfy a significant share of demand, with many factors to be considered when proposing a bio-refinery based on any feedstock, which are determined by full life-cycle analysis.
If 25% of the available material were used, about 175 million gallons per year could be produced.

MSW (Municipal Solid Waste)

Though about 60% of the waste stream is cellulosic material such as yard trimmings, urban waste and paper, this source is not considered a viable option for a number of reasons; these include existing industries that recycle materials and the landfill’s use of green waste as “Alternative Daily Cover” (ADC). Co-location of ethanol production is possible, but only up to about 10 MGY of production. When capital investment is considered, it is generally considered most economical to build larger capacity facilities.
The future of MSW being used for ethanol conversion does not look good. At best, 100 MGY of capacity may eventually come online, but it will be an uphill struggle to compete with higher value uses already in place.



Dedicated Energy Crops

There are 28 million acres of agricultural land in California, of which 10 million acres are established cropland. If 10% of this cropland (1 million acres) were dedicated to production of hemp as an energy and fiber crop, we could produce 150-500 million gallons of ethanol per year.
Greater estimates would result from expanding the analysis to include use of agricultural lands not currently applied to crop production as well as additional land not currently devoted to agriculture. A California Department of Food and Agriculture estimate suggests that each 1 million acres of crop production, occupying roughly 1% of the state’s total land area, would supply the ethanol equivalent of about 3% of California’s current gasoline demand.[viii]

Barriers

A barrier to the development of a cellulose-to-ethanol industry is availability, consistency and make-up, and location of feedstock. Dedicated crops, such as switchgrass[ix], resolve these problems. Cannabis hemp will enhance business opportunities because we can “tailor” the cannabis plant fractions to satisfy multiple end uses such as high value composites, fine paper, nitrogen rich fertilizer, CO2 , medicines, plastics, fabrics and polymers – just a portion of the many possible end uses.

Benefits

Benefits of a dedicated energy crop include consistency of feedstock supply, enhanced co-product opportunities, and increased carbon sequestration. It is commonly held that agricultural industries must focus on multiple value-added products from the various fractions of plants. This value-adding enhances rural development by providing jobs and facilities for value-adding operations. Hemp[x] lends itself to this in a unique way due to the high value of its bast fiber. Market prices for well-cleaned, composite-grade natural fiber are about 55¢ per pound ($1,100 ton); lower value uses, such as in some paper-making, bring $400-$700 per ton, while other value-adding options, such as pulping for fine papers[xi], could increase the value of the fiber to $2,500 per ton.

The Fuel and Fiber Company Method

The Fuel and Fiber Company Method[xii] employs a mechanical separation step to extract the high-value bast fiber[xiii] as a first step in processing. The remaining core material is to undergo conversion to alcohol and other co-products. There is no waste stream and the system will provide a net carbon reduction due to increased biomass production. Conversion efficiency of hemp core is relative to the lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose content and method used. The following table lists some materials often cited as potential sources of biomass and their chemical make-up. A challenge is conversion of hemicellulose to glucose; yet this challenge has been met recently by Genencor, Arkenol, Iogen, and others. These technologies provide conversion of hemicellulose and cellulose fractions to glucose using cellulase enzymes or acid.
Hemp
Cellulose
Hemicellulose
Lignin
Bast
64.8 %
7.7%
4.3 %
Core
34.5 %
17.8%
20.8 %
Soft Pine
44%
26%
27.8%
Spruce
42%
27%
28.6%
Wheat Straw
34%
27.6%
18%
Rice Straw
32.1%
24.0%
12.5%
Corn Stover
28%
28%
11%
Switchgrass
32.5%
26.4%
17.8%
Chemical composition of Industrial Hemp as compared to other plant matter
Lignin has long been viewed as a problem in the processing of fiber, and detailed studies have revealed numerous methods of removal and degradation; commonly it is burned for process heat and power generation. Advances in gasification and turbine technologies enable on-site power and heat generation, and should be seriously considered in any full-scale proposal. Additionally, by full chemical assay and careful market evaluation numerous co-product and value-adding opportunities exist. Such assay should include a NIRS (Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy) analysis, with as many varieties and conditions of material as can be gathered.
Reductions in lignin achieved by cultivation and harvest techniques, germplasm development and custom enzyme development will optimize processing output and efficiency. Incremental advances in system efficiencies related to these production improvements create a significant financial incentive for investors.
The Fuel and Fiber Company Renewable Resource System will process 300,000 to 600,000 tons of biomass per year, per facility; 25% to 35% of this will be high-value grades of core-free bast fiber. The remaining 65% to 75% of biomass will be used for the conversion process. Each facility will process input from 60,000 to 170,000 acres. Outputs are: Ethanol: 10-25 MGY (Million Gallons per Year), Fiber: 67,000 to 167,000 tons per year, and other co-products; fertilizer, animal feed, etc. to be determined. Hemp production will average 3.9 tons per acre with average costs of $520 per acre.

 

Hemp Biomass Production Model Using the Fuel and Fiber Company Method[xiv]

Min
Max
Average
Improve 20%
Totals
Sell 1
Sell 2
Total 1
Total 2
Tons per Acre
1.5
5
3.25
0.65
3.9
Lbs. Bast
(Separated 90-94%)
750
2500
1625
325
1950
0.35
0.55
$682.50
$1,072.50
Lbs. Hurd
2250
7500
4875
975
5850
Gallons Per Ton
20
80
50
$2.00
$3.00
Gallons Per Acre
146
292.5
438.8
Ethanol costs
Per Gallon
0.92
1.37
1.145
167.46
167.46
Ethanol profit
$125.04
$271.29
Gross
$807.54
$1,343.79
Production Costs
Per Acre
424
617
520.5
$520.50
$520.50
Separation costs
Per Ton
41.54
75.68
58.61
$228.58
$228.58
Costs
$749.08
$749.08
Profit
$58.46
$594.71
Administrative & License %
2
$16.15
$26.88
NET
$42.31
$567.84
Capacity
Acres
Tons Fiber
10 MGY Facility
68,376
66,667
Annual
$2,893,256
$38,826,590
25 MGY Facility
170,940
166,667
Profits
$7,233,141
$97,066,474
Total Admin & License
$1,104,333
$4,594,167
Capital costs not included. Estimated capital costs are $135 to $150 million per facility, plus crop payments. To add a pulping operation will require an additional $100 million and adds $117 per ton of fiber processed for pulp, which has a market value of up to $2,500 per ton. The most conservative estimates possible were used for this study. A full-scale feasibility study is needed to validate assumptions and projections. An additional $35 per ton environmental impact benefit should also be factored into future projections[xv].


Economic Impact

Employment

Employment for hemp production, calculated at one worker per 40 acres farmed[xvi], results in a total of 1,700 to 4,275 new jobs, if 10% of California’s cropland is put into production of cannabis hemp. These jobs are created across all traditional agricultural employment sectors, upon full development of the system.
The processing plants will also create new jobs in these areas[xvii]:
·      Administrative & Sales – 15 to 25 per facility
·      Research & Development – 25 to 50 statewide
·      Engineering & Technical – 75 to 100 statewide
·      Construction & Maintenance – 150 to 300 statewide
·      Transportation & Material Handling – 10 to 20 per facility
·      General Labor – 25 to 50 per facility

Construction

Each facility will incur $100-300 million in construction costs. Much of the equipment and labor will be procured locally, creating new jobs and opportunities for entrepreneurs to provide equipment and services to this new industry.

Related agricultural activities

At an average cost of $520 per acre, returns to farmers will range from $50-$500 profit per acre. Used in rotation with other crops, hemp can help reduce herbicide use resulting in savings to the farmer on production of crops other than hemp.

Environmental Impact

There are a great number of environmental impacts to be considered, including;
·      Water use. Agricultural operations & processing will consume hundreds of millions of gallons.
·      Large mono-crop systems have been problematic. Though hemp lends itself well to mono-cropping, effective & feasible rotation schemes must be devised.
·      Genetically Modified Organisms – Are key to efficient conversions but may pose a great threat to life. This is an issue that must be handled with complete transparency & integrity.
·      Waste streams generated – Though expected to be low, a detailed accounting must be made and addressed.
·      Creation of “Carbon Sink” to absorb carbon
·      Improved land and water management
·      In-State fuel production – reducing transport costs and associated effects
·      Reduction in emissions (Continued use of RFG)
·      $35 per acre total environmental benefit



[i] Community Power Corporation, 8420 S. Continental Divide Road, Littleton, CO 80127
[ii] Corporation For Future Resources, !909 Chowkeebin Court, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
[iii] Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs FactSheet “Growing Industrial Hemp in Ontario” 08/00
[iv] A Brief Analysis of the Characteristics of Industrial Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) Seed Grown in Northern Ontario in 1998. May 19, 1999 Herb A. Hinz, Undergraduate Thesis, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario
[v] IAN S. WATSON, AIA BioDiesel Expert
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
[vi] CIFAR Conference XIV, “Cracking the Nut: Bioprocessing Lignocellulose to Renewable Products and Energy”, June 4, 2001
[vii] California Energy Commission report “COSTS AND BENEFITS OF A BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PRODUCTION INDUSTRY IN CALIFORNIA”, March, 2001
[viii] California Energy Commission report “EVALUATION OF BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL FUEL POTENTIAL IN CALIFORNIA”, December, 1999 pg iv 4-5
[ix] Switchgrass is the leading candidate under consideration by DOE. Numerous studies are available upon request.
[x] Cannabis Sativa, commonly know as “hemp” is included in a list of potential field crops considered as Candidate Energy Crops in the December 1999 California Energy Commission report “EVALUATION OF BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL FUEL POTENTIAL IN CALIFORNIA” pg. iv-3
[xi] Hemp Pulp and Paper Production Gertjan van Roekel jr.
ATO-DLO Agrotechnology, P.O.box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands
Van Roekel, G J, 1994. Hemp pulp and paper production. Journal of the International Hemp Association 1: 12-14.
[xii] Fuel and Fiber Company was formed to promote a renewable resource system using fibrous crops such as hemp and kenaf to produce high-value natural fiber, ethanol and other co-products. www.FuelandFiber.com
[xiii] All of the hemp fibre produced and sold by Hempline (www.hempline.com) is made from hemp grown without pesticides and processed without chemicals. The fibre is a uniform natural golden colour typical of field retted stalks. The fibre has a moisture regain of 12% and excellent fibre tenacity. The fibre is pressed into high compression bales to minimize transportation costs.
The fibre is available in 40ft. and 20 ft. containers, truckloads or by the bale and shipped internationally. Samples of the fibre are available for trials upon request. The pricing varies based on the fibre grade, and is comparable or more cost effective than many natural and synthetic fibres.
Hempline primary hemp fibre comes in the following grades:
Ultra clean Grade Fibre
·       99.9% clean of core fibre Value: .55 + lb.
·       Dust extracted
·       Available in staples lengths between 1/2″ to 6″ and sliver.
·       Well opened with a typical staple denier of between 15 to 65
·       Applications include: nonwovens, composites, textiles, any where that a very clean well opened fibre with uniform staple length is needed.
Composite Grade Fibre
·       96 – 99% clean of core fibre Value: .35 – .55 lb.
·       Dust extracted
·       Available in staples lengths between 1″ to 6″.
·       Fairly well opened with a typical staple denier of between 50 to 125
·       Applications include: a range of composites such as automotive, furniture and construction; nonwovens; insulation.
General Purpose Grade Fibre Value: .20 lb.
·       50 – 75% clean of core fibre
·       Staple lengths vary between 1″ to 6″. Can be modified according to your requirements
·       Applications include: fibre for hydro mulch; cement and plaster filler; insulation; geo-matting.
Core fibre
For animal bedding and garden mulch, under the HempChips(tm) brand, is available in 3.2 cu. ft. (90 L) compressed bags through retail outlets and direct-to-stable in truckload quantities.
[xiv] Based on 20% improvement over Canadian production per Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Factsheet “Growing Industrial Hemp in Ontario”, 08/00
[xv] DOE calculation – See Chariton Valley project reports.
[xvi] California Agricultural Employment Report
[xvii] Estimate only. Actual numbers need to be discovered and confirmed.

CÁÑAMO BIOMASA PARA LA ENERGÍA

CÁÑAMO BIOMASA PARA LA ENERGÍA
RV3
Tim Castleman
© combustible y fibra Company, 2001 , 2006


Tabla de contenidos

Tabla de Contents_____________________________________________________________ 2
Introduction_________________________________________________________________ 3
La biomasa se puede utilizar formas de energía production____________________________________ 3
Quema :_________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Aceites :____________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Conversión de celulosa en alcohol :____________________________________________________________ 4
Acerca de Hemp_________________________________________________________________ 5
Cáñamo aceite de semilla de Bio Diesel____________________________________________________ 5
La producción de oil__________________________________________________________________________ 5
La producción de Bio-Diesel____________________________________________________________________ 5
El cáñamo de celulosa para Ethanol_____________________________________________________ 6
Bosque Adelgazamiento y Slash, Mill Wastes________________________________________________________ 6
Agrícolas Waste_________________________________________________________________________ 7
RSU (Residuos Sólidos Urbanos )______________________________________________________________ 7
Dedicado Energía Crops_____________________________________________________________________ 8
Barriers__________________________________________________________________________________ 8
Benefits_________________________________________________________________________________ 8
La Compañía de Combustible y de fibra Method_____________________________________________ 9
La biomasa de cáñamo Modelo de Producción Utilizando el Método de combustible y fibra de la empresa _______________________ 10
Económica Impact____________________________________________________________ 11
Employment_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Construction_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Relacionados con la agricultura activities________________________________________________________________ 11
Ambientales Impact________________________________________________________ 11
Las notas al final y 12 References_______________________________________________________


Cáñamo Biomasa para la Energía

Introducción

Los defensores del cáñamo reclamo cáñamo industrial podría ser una buena fuente de biomasa para ayudar a resolver nuestras necesidades de energía. Desde la crisis petrolera de los años setenta el trabajo se ha logrado mucho en el área de producción de energía con biomasa. La biomasa es cualquier materia vegetal o de árboles en grandes cantidades. Estas décadas de investigación han llevado al descubrimiento de varias formas de convertir la biomasa en energía y otros productos útiles.
Las preguntas de la idoneidad de la biomasa en comparación con otras fuentes “verdes” de energía son objeto de numerosos estudios y no se tratan aquí. Otras preguntas sobre el impacto económico detallado y ambientales, el uso de los transgénicos, y la agronomía son también fuera del alcance de este análisis.
Este trabajo pretende explorar las opciones disponibles, y se esbozan algunas de las barreras y oportunidades con respecto a ellos.

Biomasa maneras se puede utilizar para la producción de energía

La quema:

·       Co-alimentadas con carbón para reducir las emisiones y compensar una parte de la utilización del carbón
·       Queman para producir electricidad
·       Granulado a las estructuras de calor
·       Hecho o cortado en los registros de la calefacción
La biomasa que se quema es por lo general un valor de $ 30-50 por tonelada, lo que hace que el cáñamo tallo toda la biomasa que se quema poco práctico debido al alto valor de su fibra basta. Una excepción se puede encontrar en la consideración de las últimas tecnologías de gasificación utilizado en pequeña escala local y en remoto las aplicaciones rurales.
·       Gasificación ( Pyrrolysis )
Gasificación utiliza calor para convertir la biomasa en “syngas” (gas sintético) y el aceite combustible de bajo grado, que tiene un contenido energético de los que alrededor del 40% de diesel de petróleo. Los productos son en su mayoría “Char” y cenizas. Esta tecnología está disponible comercialmente en varias formas y pueden ser una opción viable de acuerdo a las condiciones ambientales y económicos. A partir de 1999, la Corporación de Energía de la Comunidad [i] se unieron a los EE.UU. National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) y Shell Renovables, SA de CV o diseñar y desarrollar una nueva generación de pequeños sistemas modulares biopoder. El primer prototipo de sistema SMB nominal de 15 kWe se desplegó en la localidad de Alaminos en Filipinas a principios de 2001. El sistema totalmente automatizado puede usar una variedad de combustibles de biomasa para generar electricidad, potencia en el eje y el calor.

Aceites:

·       Aceite vegetal, semillas y plantas utilizadas “tal cual” en los motores diesel
·       Biodiesel – aceite vegetal convertidos por la reacción química
·       Convertido en alta calidad no tóxico lubricantes
Hay una serie de plantas de alto contenido de aceite, y muchos de los procesos que producen el aceite vegetal como producto de desecho. Estos incluyen soja, maíz, coco, palma, canola, semilla de colza, y un número de otras especies promisorias. Cualquiera de estos aceites pueden ser convertidos en biodiesel como se describe más adelante, con un costo de materia prima de $ 0 + por galón.

Conversión de celulosa en alcohol:

·       Hidrólisis (enzimática y ácida)
Conversión de la celulosa en glucosa fermentable tiene la mayor promesa, tanto desde el punto de vista de la producción y el suministro de materia prima. DOE (NREL) y un número de universidades y empresas privadas han estado desarrollando esta tecnología y ha logrado una serie de hitos. Las estimaciones de producción de 80 a 0 litros por tonelada de biomasa que esta tecnología muy atractivo .
·       Digestor anaeróbico (Methan )
La digestión anaeróbica se utiliza para capturar metano de cualquier material de desecho. Se confirma la utilización de la tecnología en la comercialización de gases de vertedero, gases de sistema de tratamiento de aguas residuales, desechos agrícolas de diversas fuentes, especialmente de cerdo y estiércol de ganado. Es muy adecuado para la generación de energía distribuida, cuando co-ubicada con eléctrico equipos de generación. Por ejemplo, Corporación de los recursos futuros , [ii] y la Compañía Minusa Café, SA de CV, ubicada cerca de Itaipé, Minas Gerais, Brasil, se han unido para construir una instalación de fermentación de la digestión anaerobia en la operación de café Minusa. El resumen de 600 metros cúbicos r está diseñado para producir continuamente gas metano rico, que se utilizará para secar el café y la producción de energía eléctrica, así como fertilizante rico en nitrógeno orgánico anaerobia .
CFR / Minusa digestor anaerobio en Brasil.
El digestor se construye a partir de bloques de granito nativa extraída en el lugar de Minusa.

Archivo escrito por Adobe Photoshop ® 4.0

Esta tecnología puede ser atractiva en algunos casos, cuando co-ubicada con un centro de procesamiento de la fibra de cáñamo o en localidades remotas para ofrecer la generación de energía locales.


Acerca de cáñamo

El cáñamo industrial se puede cultivar en la mayoría de los climas y suelos marginales. Se requiere poco o nada de herbicidas y pesticidas que no, y utiliza menos agua que el algodón. Las mediciones realizadas en Ridgetown Colegio indicar el cultivo necesita 300-400 mm (10-13 pulgadas) de lluvia equivalente. Los rendimientos varían de acuerdo a las condiciones locales y rango de 1.5 a 6 toneladas secas de biomasa por hectárea [iii] . Tierras de cultivo rico de California y el medio ambiente cada vez se espera que aumenten los rendimientos en un 20% sobre los resultados de Canadá, que tendrá un promedio de al menos 3,9 toneladas de hueso seco por hectárea.

Cáñamo aceite de semilla de Bio Diesel

La producción de aceite

Crecido de las semillas oleaginosas, los rendimientos productor canadiense promedio de 1 tonelada / hectárea, o sea alrededor de 400 lbs. por hectárea. De semillas de cannabis contiene un 28% de aceite (112 lbs.), O alrededor de 15 galones por acre. Los costos de producción utilizando estas cifras sería alrededor de $ 35 por galón. Algunas variedades son reportados [iv] para producir tanto petróleo como el 38%, y un registro de 2.000 libras. por hectárea se registró en 1999. A este ritmo, 760 de aceite por hectárea lbs.of se traduciría en unos 100 galones de petróleo, con los costos de producción total de alrededor de 5,20 dólares por galón. Este aceite puede ser utilizado tal cual en los motores diesel modificados, o se convertirán en biodiesel mediante un relativamente simple, proceso automatizado. Existen varios sistemas en todo el mundo de desarrollo diseñado para producir biodiesel a pequeña escala, como en las fincas el uso de “cosecha propia” los cultivos de aceite.

La producción de Bio-Diesel

Básicamente, los ésteres de metilo, o biodiesel, como se le llama comúnmente, se puede hacer de cualquier aceite o grasa, como aceite de semilla de cáñamo. La reacción requiere sólo de petróleo, un alcohol (generalmente metanol) y un catalizador (generalmente hidróxido de sodio [NaOH o drenaje limpio]). La reacción sólo produce biodiesel y una menor cantidad de glicerol o glicerina. 
Los costos de los materiales necesarios para la reacción son los costos asociados con la producción de aceite de semillas de cáñamo, el costo de metanol y NaOH al. En los casos en que se utiliza aceite vegetal usado, o WVO, el costo del petróleo es, por supuesto, gratis. Por lo general los costos de metanol cerca de $ 2 por galón y NaOH cuesta alrededor de $ 5 por 500 gramos o alrededor de 0,01 dólares por gramo. Para un típico lote de 17 galones de biodiesel, que empezaría con 14 galones de aceite de semilla de cáñamo, añadir que el 15% en volumen de alcohol (o 2.1 galones) y 500 g de NaOH. El proceso toma alrededor de 2 horas para completar y requiere alrededor de 2000 vatios de energía. Eso equivale a alrededor de 2kw/hr o alrededor de $ 0,10 de la energía (suponiendo que $ 0.05 por kw / h). Por lo que el costo total por cada galón de biodiesel es de $? (Aceite) + 2.1 x $ 2 (metanol) + $ 5 (NaOH) + $ 0.10 (energía) / 14 galones = 0,66 dólares por galón, más el costo del petróleo. [v] Otros costos puede incluyen las ventas, transporte, mantenimiento, amortización, seguros y mano de obra. 


El cáñamo de celulosa para etanol

Otro método implica la conversión de la celulosa en etanol, que se puede hacer de varias maneras, incluyendo la gasificación, hidrólisis ácida y una tecnología que utiliza enzimas diseñadas para convertir la celulosa en glucosa, que se fermenta para producir alcohol. Otro enfoque utilizando enzimas convertir la celulosa directamente al alcohol, lo que conduce a importantes ahorros de costes de proceso.
Los gastos corrientes asociados a estos procesos de conversión son de $ 1.37 [vi] por galón de combustible que se produce, más el costo de la materia prima. De estos $ 1,37, los costos de las enzimas son alrededor de $ 0.50 por galón, los actuales esfuerzos de investigación están dirigidas hacia la reducción de esta cantidad a $ 0.05 por galón. Hay un crédito fiscal federal de $ 0.54 por galón y una serie de otros incentivos disponibles. Las tasas de conversión varían desde un mínimo de 25-30 litros por tonelada de biomasa de 100 galones por tonelada utilizando la última tecnología.
En 1998 la demanda total de gasolina de California fue de 14 mil millones de galones. Cuando el etanol se utiliza para reemplazar el MTBE como oxigenante, esto creará una demanda de California en más de 700 millones de galones por año. El MTBE es que eliminarse gradualmente su uso en 2003 de acuerdo con la ley estatal.
En este caso se puede considerar la producción de biomasa a partir de una perspectiva mucho más amplia. Fuentes de materia prima en la consideración de estos procesos son los siguientes:
 
Nos ocuparemos de estas, a su vez y demostrar por qué uno de los cultivos dedicados a fines energéticos tiene un potencial importante para la producción de etanol en California, ¿por qué el cáñamo es un buen candidato como un cultivo energético dedicado, y cómo se puede representar el mejor camino de alcanzar el 34% de etanol próximos California la demanda del mercado de al menos 580-750 million galones por año. [vii]

Bosque Adelgazamiento y Slash, Mill Residuos

A 1999 la Comisión de Energía de California biomasa evaluación de los recursos estimados 13,8 millones de toneladas de hueso seco (5,5 Mill, 4.5 Tala y raleos 3.8) están disponibles en California.
Si se practica dentro de las regulaciones estatales y federales, el uso de esta fuente puede tener efectos beneficiosos significativos. La eliminación de exceso de biomasa de los bosques reduce la frecuencia y la intensidad de los incendios, ayudando a controlar la propagación de enfermedades, y contribuye a la salud de los bosques en general. En 59 a 66 galones por tonelada, esto podría suministrar hasta 900 millones de galones por año.
Una propuesta California proyecto , Mill Collins Pine Chester, lo que contribuirá de 20 mGy y ser colocado con una instalación de biomasa con motor generador de 12 MW de electricidad, sin embargo, existe una resistencia significativa a esos usos por varios grupos ambientalistas prominentes, y por buena razón – esto podría llegar a conducen a la destrucción generalizada del hábitat de los bosques por las compañías de energía exagerada dispuestos a ignorar el medio ambiente en nombre de la seguridad energética nacional. Las barreras incluyen también los costos de cosecha y las capacidades como algunos roza y aclareo son muy difíciles de acceso, y el alto contenido de lignina de estos materiales.
Si el 25% de los materiales disponibles se utilizaron unos 200 millones de galones por año se podrían producir.

De residuos agrícolas

En California, más de 500.000 hectáreas de arroz se cultivan cada año. Cada hectárea produce 1-2.5 toneladas de paja de arroz que se han quemado hasta ahora. Métodos alternativos de eliminación son necesarios, y la conversión a etanol ha estado en desarrollo durante varios años. Actualmente hay dos proyectos en marcha que propone utilizar la paja de arroz, uno en California (Gridley) y uno en Jennings, Louisiana. Si el proyecto Gridley se aplique plenamente, se añaden 25 millones de galones de producción a los ya delgados California 9 millones de galones por año. Las barreras incluyen gastos de recaudación y el alto contenido de sílice (13%) de paja de arroz.
Otros desechos agrícolas incluyen recortes de huerta, cáscaras de nuez y almendra, y los residuos de procesamiento de alimentos, para un total de alrededor de 700 potenciales MGy si todos los desechos agrícolas se utilizaron.Esto es, por supuesto, poco práctico, ya que algunos deben ser devueltos a la tierra de alguna manera, más los gastos de recogida y transporte tendrán un efecto sobre la viabilidad de un producto de desecho en particular. Los residuos agrícolas tienen el potencial para satisfacer una parte significativa de la demanda, con muchos factores a considerar cuando se propone una bio-refinería sobre la base de cualquier materia prima, que son determinados por completo análisis del ciclo vital.
Si el 25% de los materiales disponibles se utilizaron unos 175 millones de galones por año se podrían producir.

RSU (Residuos Sólidos Urbanos)

Aunque alrededor del 60% del flujo de residuos es un material celulósico, como restos de poda, residuos urbanos y el papel, esta fuente no se considera una opción viable para un número de razones, que incluyen las industrias existentes de que los materiales de reciclaje y el uso del vertedero de residuos verdes como “Alternativa Diario Cover” (ADC). La co-localización de la producción de etanol es posible, pero sólo hasta alrededor de 10 mGy de la producción. Cuando la inversión de capital se considera, en general se considera más económico de construir grandes instalaciones de capacidad.
El futuro de los RSU que se utilizará para la conversión de etanol no se ve bien. A lo sumo, 100 mGy de la capacidad puede llegar a entrar en línea, pero será una lucha cuesta arriba para competir con mayor valor ya utiliza en su lugar.


 
Los cultivos dedicados Energía

Hay 28 millones de acres de tierras agrícolas en California, de los cuales 10 millones de hectáreas son tierras de cultivo establecido. Si el 10% de este cultivo (1 millón de hectáreas) se dedica a la producción de cáñamo como la energía y el cultivo de fibra, que puede producir 150-500 million de galones de etanol por año.
Mayor estima que el resultado de ampliar el análisis para incluir el uso de las tierras agrícolas que actualmente no se aplica a la producción de cultivos, así como terrenos adicionales que actualmente no dedicados a la agricultura.Un Departamento de Agricultura y la Alimentación estimación sugiere que cada 1 millón de acres de producción de cultivos, que ocupan aproximadamente el 1% de la superficie del estado total de la tierra, sería el equivalente de suministro de etanol de aproximadamente el 3% de la demanda actual de gasolina de California. [viii]

Barreras

Un obstáculo para el desarrollo de una industria de la celulosa en etanol es la disponibilidad, consistencia y composición, y la ubicación de la materia prima. Cultivos específicos, tales como switchgrass [ix] , resolver estos problemas. Cannabis mejorará las oportunidades de negocio, ya que podemos “adaptar” las fracciones de la planta de cannabis para satisfacer fines múltiples usos, tales como compuestos de alto valor, papel fino, el fertilizante rico en nitrógeno, el CO 2 , medicamentos, plásticos, tejidos y polímeros – sólo una parte de la posible final de muchos usos.

Beneficios

Beneficios de un cultivo energético dedicado incluyen la consistencia del suministro de materia prima, el aumento de las oportunidades de co-producto, y el secuestro de carbono mayor. Se sostiene comúnmente que las industrias agrícola debe enfocarse en varios productos de valor agregado de las diversas fracciones de las plantas. Este valor añadido aumenta el desarrollo rural, proporcionando puestos de trabajo y facilidades para las operaciones de valor añadido. Cáñamo [x] se presta a esto de una manera única debido al alto valor de su fibra basta. Precios de mercado para bien limpia, compuesto de grado fibra natural son aproximadamente el 55 ¢ por libra ($ 1.100 por tonelada), inferior utiliza el valor, como en algunos de fabricación de papel, trae $ 400 – $ 700 por tonelada, mientras que otros de valor agregado opciones, como la fabricación de pulpa para papel fino [xi] , podría aumentar el valor de la fibra a $ 2.500 por tonelada.

El combustible y el método de la Compañía de fibra

El combustible y el método de la Compañía de fibra [xii] emplea una etapa de separación mecánica para extraer el alto valor del líber fibra [xiii] como un primer paso en el proceso. El material del núcleo que queda es someterse a la conversión al alcohol y otras co-productos. No hay flujo de residuos y el sistema proporcionará una reducción neta de carbono debido a la producción de biomasa aumentó. Eficiencia de conversión del núcleo de cáñamo es en relación con el contenido de lignina, celulosa y hemicelulosa y el método utilizado. La siguiente tabla muestra algunos de los materiales a menudo citado como fuentes potenciales de biomasa y su composición química. Un desafío es la conversión de la hemicelulosa de la glucosa, sin embargo, este reto se ha cumplido recientemente por Genencor, Arkenol, Iogen, y otros. Estas tecnologías proporcionan la conversión de las fracciones de la hemicelulosa y la celulosa en glucosa el uso de enzimas celulasas o ácido .
Cáñamo
Celulosa
Hemicelulosa
Lignina
Líber
64,8%
7,7%
4,3%
Núcleo
34,5%
17,8%
20,8%
Pino suave
44%
26%
27,8%
Picea
42%
27%
28,6%
Paja de trigo
34%
El 27,6%
18%
La paja de arroz
32,1%
24,0%
12,5%
Rastrojo de maíz
28%
28%
11%
El pasto switchgrass
32,5%
26,4%
17,8%
Composición química del cáñamo industrial, en comparación con la materia de otras plantas
Lignina siempre ha sido visto como un problema en el procesamiento de la fibra, y estudios detallados han revelado numerosos métodos de eliminación y degradación, normalmente se quema por el calor de proceso y generación de energía. Los avances en las tecnologías de gasificación y de la turbina permitirá en el sitio de alimentación y generación de calor, y deben ser consideradas seriamente en una propuesta a gran escala. Además, al análisis químico completo y una evaluación cuidadosa del mercado numerosos co-productos y oportunidades de valor añadido existentes. Ensayo debe incluir una NIRS (espectroscopia de reflectancia en el infrarrojo cerca) el análisis, con tantas variedades y condiciones de material como pueda ser recogida.
La reducción de la lignina alcanzado por las técnicas de cultivo y la cosecha, el desarrollo de germoplasma y el desarrollo de enzimas personalizados optimizar el proceso de producción y la eficiencia. Avances graduales en la eficiencia del sistema en relación con estas mejoras de producción crean un incentivo importante para los inversores financieros.
El sistema de la compañía de combustible y fibra de Recursos Renovables procesará 300.000 a 600.000 toneladas de biomasa por año, por cada instalación, el 25% a 35% de esto será de gran valor de los grados básicos libres de fibra basta. El restante 65% al 75% de la biomasa se ​​utiliza para el proceso de conversión. Cada instalación será procesar la entrada de 60.000 a 170.000 hectáreas. Las salidas son: Etanol: 10-25 mGy (millones de galones por año), Fibra: 67.000 a 167.000 toneladas por año, y otros co-productos, fertilizantes, piensos, etc que se determine. La producción de cáñamo tendrá un promedio de 3,9 toneladas por hectárea, con costos promedio de $ 520 por acre.

 

La biomasa de cáñamo de producción modelo con el combustible y el método de la Compañía de fibra [xiv]

Min
Max
Promedio
Mejorar un 20%
Totales
Vender un
Venta 2
Un total de 1
Un total de 2
Toneladas por hectárea
1.5
5
3.25
0.65
3.9
Lbs. Líber
(Separados por 90 a 94%)
750
2500
1625
325
1950
0.35
0.55
$ 682.50
$ 1,072.50
Lbs. Hurd
2250
7500
4875
975
5850
Galones por tonelada
20
80
50
$ 2.00
$ 3.00
Galones por acre
146
292,5
438,8
Los costos del etanol
Por galón
0.92
1.37
1.145
167.46
167.46
Etanol ganancias
$ 125.04
$ 271.29
Bruto
$ 807.54
$ 1,343.79
Costos de Producción
Por Acre
424
617
520,5
$ 520.50
$ 520.50
Los costos de separación
Por tonelada
41.54
75.68
58.61
$ 228.58
$ 228.58
Costos
$ 749.08
$ 749.08
Lucro
$ 58.46
$ 594.71
% De gastos administrativos y de licencia
2
$ 16.15
$ 26.88
NET
$ 42.31
$ 567.84
Capacidad
Acres
Toneladas de fibra
10 mGy Fondo
68.376
66.667
Anual
$ 2.893.256
$ 38.826.590
25 MGy Fondo
170940
166667
Beneficios
$ 7.233.141
$ 97.066.474
Administración total y Licencia
$ 1.104.333
$ 4.594.167
Los costos de capital no incluidos. Costos de capital estimados son de $ 135 a $ 150 millones por planta, más los pagos de los cultivos. Para agregar una operación de fabricación de pulpa requiere un adicional de $ 100 millones y agrega $ 117 por tonelada de fibra procesada de la pulpa, que tiene un valor de mercado de hasta 2.500 dólares por tonelada. Las estimaciones más conservadoras posible se utilizaron para este estudio. Un estudio de viabilidad a gran escala es necesaria para validar las hipótesis y proyecciones. Un adicional de $ 35 por tonelada beneficio de impacto ambiental también debe tenerse en cuenta en las proyecciones futuras [xv] .


Impacto económico

Empleo

De empleo para la producción de cáñamo, calculado a un trabajador por cada 40 acres cultivados [xvi] , se traduce en un total de 1.700 a 4.275 nuevos puestos de trabajo, si el 10% de las tierras de cultivo de California se pone en la producción de cáñamo cannabis. Estos trabajos se crean en todos los sectores del empleo agrícola tradicional, en el desarrollo completo del sistema.
Las plantas de procesamiento también creará nuevos puestos de trabajo en estas áreas [xvii] :
·       Las ventas y administrativos – de 15 a 25 por planta
·       Investigación y Desarrollo – 25 a 50 en todo el estado
·       Ingeniería y Técnica – 75 a 100 en todo el estado
·       Construcción y mantenimiento – 150 a 300 en todo el estado
·       Transporte y manipulación de materiales – 10 a 20 instalaciones por
·       General del Trabajo – 25 a 50 por planta

Construcción

Cada instalación incurrirá en $ 100-300 millones de dólares en costos de construcción. Gran parte del equipo y mano de obra se adquirirán a nivel local, la creación de nuevos empleos y oportunidades para los empresarios para proporcionar equipos y servicios para esta nueva industria.

Relacionados con las actividades agrícolas

A un costo promedio de $ 520 por hectárea, los rendimientos de los agricultores van desde $ 50 – $ 500 ganancia por hectárea. Utilizado en rotación con otros cultivos, el cáñamo puede ayudar a reducir el uso de herbicidas resulta en ahorros para el productor a la producción de otros cultivos de cáñamo.

Impacto Ambiental

Hay un gran número de impactos ambientales a ser considerados, incluyendo;
·       El uso del agua. Las operaciones agrícolas y de procesamiento se consumen cientos de millones de galones.
·       Grandes sistemas de monocultivo han sido problemáticos. Aunque el cáñamo se presta bien para el monocultivo, eficaz y viable esquemas de rotación debe ser concebido.
·       Organismos modificados genéticamente – son la clave para conversiones eficiente, pero puede representar una gran amenaza para la vida. Este es un tema que debe ser manejado con total transparencia e integridad.
·       Los flujos de residuos generados – Aunque espera que sea baja, una contabilidad detallada debe ser hecha y dirigida.
·       Creación de “sumidero de carbono” para absorber carbono
·       Mejorada de la tierra y la gestión del agua
·       En el Estado de producción de combustible – la reducción de los costes de transporte y los efectos asociados
·       Reducción de las emisiones (El uso continuado de RFG)
·       $ 35 por acre beneficio ambiental total



[I] de la Comunidad Power Corporation, 8420 S. Carretera División Continental, Littleton, CO 80127
[Ii] Para Corporación recursos en el futuro,! 909 Chowkeebin Corte, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
[Iii] Ontario Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimentación y Asuntos Rurales Hoja Informativa sobre “el cultivo de cáñamo industrial en Ontario” 08/00
[Iv] Un breve análisis de las características de cáñamo industrial (Cannabis sativa L.) de siembra en el norte de Ontario en 1998. 19 de mayo 1999 Hierbas A. Hinz, Tesis de Licenciatura, Universidad de Lakehead, Thunder Bay, Ontario
[V] IAN S. Watson, AIA BioDiesel expertos
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
[Vi] Cifar XIV Conferencia, “Cracking the Nut: lignocelulosa bioprocesamiento de productos renovables y la energía”, 04 de junio 2001
[Vii] Informe de la Comisión de Energía de California “COSTOS Y BENEFICIOS DE UNA INDUSTRIA DE PRODUCCIÓN DE BIOMASA PARA ETANOL EN CALIFORNIA”, de marzo de 2001
[Viii] Informe de la Comisión de Energía de California “EVALUACIÓN DE LA BIOMASA a etanol combustible potencial en California”, diciembre de 1999 pg iv 4.5
[Ix] El pasto switchgrass es el principal candidato bajo consideración por el DOE. Numerosos estudios están disponibles bajo petición.
[X] Cannabis Sativa, comúnmente conocida como “cáñamo” está incluido en una lista de cultivos considerados como posibles candidatos en Cultivos Energéticos de diciembre de 1999 de Energía de California informe de la Comisión “Evaluación de la biomasa en etanol combustible potencial en California” pg. IV-3
[Xi] pulpa de cáñamo y papel Producción Gertjan van Roekel jr.
ATO-DLO Agrotecnología, PO Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, Países Bajos
Van Roekel, GJ, 1994. Cáñamo producción de pulpa y papel. Revista de la Asociación Internacional de la Marihuana 1: 12-14.
[Xii] de combustible y la Compañía de fibra fue formado para promover un sistema de recursos renovables, el uso de cultivos fibrosos, como el cáñamo y el kenaf para producir fibra de alto valor natural, el etanol y otros co-productos. www.FuelandFiber.com
[Xiii] Todas las fibras de cáñamo, producido y vendido por Hempline (Www.hempline.com) está hecha de cáñamo cultivado sin pesticidas y elaborados sin productos químicos. La fibra es un uniforme de color natural dorado típico de los tallos de campo enriado. La fibra tiene una recuperación de humedad de 12% y la tenacidad de fibra de excelente. La fibra se prensa en fardos de alta compresión para reducir al mínimo los costos de transporte.
La fibra está disponible en 40 pies. y 20 pies contenedores, camiones o por la bala y se envían a nivel internacional. Las muestras de la fibra están disponibles para pruebas sobre la solicitud. El precio varía en función de la fibra de calidad, y tiene un costo comparable o más efectivo que muchas fibras naturales y sintéticas.
Fibra de cáñamo Hempline primaria viene en los siguientes grados:
Grado de fibra ultra limpio
·        99,9% del valor de limpia núcleo de la fibra: £ 0.55 +
·        El polvo extraído
·        Disponible en longitudes de grapas de 1 / 2 “a 6” y astilla.
·        Así se abrió con un negador del típico alimento básico de entre 15 a 65
·        Las aplicaciones incluyen: materiales no tejidos, materiales compuestos, textiles, en cualquier lugar que se necesita una fibra muy limpio y abierto con longitud de grapa uniforme.
Grado de fibra compuesta
·        96 a 99% del valor de limpia núcleo de la fibra: .35 – £ 0.55
·        El polvo extraído
·        Disponible en longitudes de grapas entre 1 “a 6”.
·        Bastante bien se abrió con un negador del típico alimento básico de entre 50 a 125
·        Las aplicaciones incluyen: una gama de compuestos, tales como muebles de automoción y construcción, telas sin tejer; aislamiento.
Uso General Grado de fibra de valor: £ 0.20
·        50 – 75% limpieza de la fibra de núcleo
·        Longitudes varían entre el 1 de primera necesidad “a 6”. Pueden ser modificados de acuerdo a sus necesidades
·        Las aplicaciones incluyen: la fibra de cobertura hidráulica, de cemento y relleno de yeso, aislamiento, geo-estera.
Núcleo de la fibra
Para cama de animales y el mantillo de jardín, bajo la HempChips ™ de la marca, está disponible en 3.2 cu. pies (90 L) comprimido a través de bolsas de tiendas y directa al estable-en cantidades camión.
[Xiv] En base a 20% de mejora de la producción canadiense de Ontario por el Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimentación y Asuntos Rurales Hoja Informativa “Creciendo cáñamo industrial en Ontario”, 08/00
[Xv] DOE cálculo – Ver Chariton Valley informes del proyecto.
[Xvi] Agrícolas de California Informe sobre el Empleo
[Xvii] Estimación solamente. Los números reales deben ser descubierto y confirmado.

Texto original en inglés:
Hemp Biomass for Energy
 Proponer una traducción mejor

CÁÑAMO BIOMASA PARA LA ENERGÍA

http://translate.google.com.mx/translate_un?hl=es&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dcannabis%2Bbiomass%2Bfuel%26hl%3Des%26biw%3D1400%26bih%3D959%26prmd%3Dimvns&rurl=translate.google.com.mx&sl=en&twu=1&u=http://fuelandfiber.com/Hemp4NRG/Hemp4NRGRV3.htm&lang=en&usg=ALkJrhjpJUNm-OuDwjH14ZQIfyNZIwpKiw

CÁÑAMO BIOMASA PARA LA ENERGÍA
RV3
Tim Castleman
© combustible y fibra Company, 2001 , 2006


Tabla de contenidos

Tabla de Contents_____________________________________________________________ 2
Introduction_________________________________________________________________ 3
La biomasa se puede utilizar formas de energía production____________________________________ 3
Quema :_________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Aceites :____________________________________________________________________________________ 3
Conversión de celulosa en alcohol :____________________________________________________________ 4
Acerca de Hemp_________________________________________________________________ 5
Cáñamo aceite de semilla de Bio Diesel____________________________________________________ 5
La producción de oil__________________________________________________________________________ 5
La producción de Bio-Diesel____________________________________________________________________ 5
El cáñamo de celulosa para Ethanol_____________________________________________________ 6
Bosque Adelgazamiento y Slash, Mill Wastes________________________________________________________ 6
Agrícolas Waste_________________________________________________________________________ 7
RSU (Residuos Sólidos Urbanos )______________________________________________________________ 7
Dedicado Energía Crops_____________________________________________________________________ 8
Barriers__________________________________________________________________________________ 8
Benefits_________________________________________________________________________________ 8
La Compañía de Combustible y de fibra Method_____________________________________________ 9
La biomasa de cáñamo Modelo de Producción Utilizando el Método de combustible y fibra de la empresa _______________________ 10
Económica Impact____________________________________________________________ 11
Employment_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Construction_____________________________________________________________________________ 11
Relacionados con la agricultura activities________________________________________________________________ 11
Ambientales Impact________________________________________________________ 11
Las notas al final y 12 References_______________________________________________________


Cáñamo Biomasa para la Energía

Introducción

Los defensores del cáñamo reclamo cáñamo industrial podría ser una buena fuente de biomasa para ayudar a resolver nuestras necesidades de energía. Desde la crisis petrolera de los años setenta el trabajo se ha logrado mucho en el área de producción de energía con biomasa. La biomasa es cualquier materia vegetal o de árboles en grandes cantidades. Estas décadas de investigación han llevado al descubrimiento de varias formas de convertir la biomasa en energía y otros productos útiles.
Las preguntas de la idoneidad de la biomasa en comparación con otras fuentes “verdes” de energía son objeto de numerosos estudios y no se tratan aquí. Otras preguntas sobre el impacto económico detallado y ambientales, el uso de los transgénicos, y la agronomía son también fuera del alcance de este análisis.
Este trabajo pretende explorar las opciones disponibles, y se esbozan algunas de las barreras y oportunidades con respecto a ellos.

Biomasa maneras se puede utilizar para la producción de energía

La quema:

·       Co-alimentadas con carbón para reducir las emisiones y compensar una parte de la utilización del carbón
·       Queman para producir electricidad
·       Granulado a las estructuras de calor
·       Hecho o cortado en los registros de la calefacción
La biomasa que se quema es por lo general un valor de $ 30-50 por tonelada, lo que hace que el cáñamo tallo toda la biomasa que se quema poco práctico debido al alto valor de su fibra basta. Una excepción se puede encontrar en la consideración de las últimas tecnologías de gasificación utilizado en pequeña escala local y en remoto las aplicaciones rurales.
·       Gasificación ( Pyrrolysis )
Gasificación utiliza calor para convertir la biomasa en “syngas” (gas sintético) y el aceite combustible de bajo grado, que tiene un contenido energético de los que alrededor del 40% de diesel de petróleo. Los productos son en su mayoría “Char” y cenizas. Esta tecnología está disponible comercialmente en varias formas y pueden ser una opción viable de acuerdo a las condiciones ambientales y económicos. A partir de 1999, la Corporación de Energía de la Comunidad [i] se unieron a los EE.UU. National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) y Shell Renovables, SA de CV o diseñar y desarrollar una nueva generación de pequeños sistemas modulares biopoder. El primer prototipo de sistema SMB nominal de 15 kWe se desplegó en la localidad de Alaminos en Filipinas a principios de 2001. El sistema totalmente automatizado puede usar una variedad de combustibles de biomasa para generar electricidad, potencia en el eje y el calor.

Aceites:

·       Aceite vegetal, semillas y plantas utilizadas “tal cual” en los motores diesel
·       Biodiesel – aceite vegetal convertidos por la reacción química
·       Convertido en alta calidad no tóxico lubricantes
Hay una serie de plantas de alto contenido de aceite, y muchos de los procesos que producen el aceite vegetal como producto de desecho. Estos incluyen soja, maíz, coco, palma, canola, semilla de colza, y un número de otras especies promisorias. Cualquiera de estos aceites pueden ser convertidos en biodiesel como se describe más adelante, con un costo de materia prima de $ 0 + por galón.

Conversión de celulosa en alcohol:

·       Hidrólisis (enzimática y ácida)
Conversión de la celulosa en glucosa fermentable tiene la mayor promesa, tanto desde el punto de vista de la producción y el suministro de materia prima. DOE (NREL) y un número de universidades y empresas privadas han estado desarrollando esta tecnología y ha logrado una serie de hitos. Las estimaciones de producción de 80 a 0 litros por tonelada de biomasa que esta tecnología muy atractivo .
·       Digestor anaeróbico (Methan )
La digestión anaeróbica se utiliza para capturar metano de cualquier material de desecho. Se confirma la utilización de la tecnología en la comercialización de gases de vertedero, gases de sistema de tratamiento de aguas residuales, desechos agrícolas de diversas fuentes, especialmente de cerdo y estiércol de ganado. Es muy adecuado para la generación de energía distribuida, cuando co-ubicada con eléctrico equipos de generación. Por ejemplo, Corporación de los recursos futuros , [ii] y la Compañía Minusa Café, SA de CV, ubicada cerca de Itaipé, Minas Gerais, Brasil, se han unido para construir una instalación de fermentación de la digestión anaerobia en la operación de café Minusa. El resumen de 600 metros cúbicos r está diseñado para producir continuamente gas metano rico, que se utilizará para secar el café y la producción de energía eléctrica, así como fertilizante rico en nitrógeno orgánico anaerobia .
CFR / Minusa digestor anaerobio en Brasil.
El digestor se construye a partir de bloques de granito nativa extraída en el lugar de Minusa.

Archivo escrito por Adobe Photoshop ® 4.0

Esta tecnología puede ser atractiva en algunos casos, cuando co-ubicada con un centro de procesamiento de la fibra de cáñamo o en localidades remotas para ofrecer la generación de energía locales.


Acerca de cáñamo

El cáñamo industrial se puede cultivar en la mayoría de los climas y suelos marginales. Se requiere poco o nada de herbicidas y pesticidas que no, y utiliza menos agua que el algodón. Las mediciones realizadas en Ridgetown Colegio indicar el cultivo necesita 300-400 mm (10-13 pulgadas) de lluvia equivalente. Los rendimientos varían de acuerdo a las condiciones locales y rango de 1.5 a 6 toneladas secas de biomasa por hectárea [iii] . Tierras de cultivo rico de California y el medio ambiente cada vez se espera que aumenten los rendimientos en un 20% sobre los resultados de Canadá, que tendrá un promedio de al menos 3,9 toneladas de hueso seco por hectárea.

Cáñamo aceite de semilla de Bio Diesel

La producción de aceite

Crecido de las semillas oleaginosas, los rendimientos productor canadiense promedio de 1 tonelada / hectárea, o sea alrededor de 400 lbs. por hectárea. De semillas de cannabis contiene un 28% de aceite (112 lbs.), O alrededor de 15 galones por acre. Los costos de producción utilizando estas cifras sería alrededor de $ 35 por galón. Algunas variedades son reportados [iv] para producir tanto petróleo como el 38%, y un registro de 2.000 libras. por hectárea se registró en 1999. A este ritmo, 760 de aceite por hectárea lbs.of se traduciría en unos 100 galones de petróleo, con los costos de producción total de alrededor de 5,20 dólares por galón. Este aceite puede ser utilizado tal cual en los motores diesel modificados, o se convertirán en biodiesel mediante un relativamente simple, proceso automatizado. Existen varios sistemas en todo el mundo de desarrollo diseñado para producir biodiesel a pequeña escala, como en las fincas el uso de “cosecha propia” los cultivos de aceite.

La producción de Bio-Diesel

Básicamente, los ésteres de metilo, o biodiesel, como se le llama comúnmente, se puede hacer de cualquier aceite o grasa, como aceite de semilla de cáñamo. La reacción requiere sólo de petróleo, un alcohol (generalmente metanol) y un catalizador (generalmente hidróxido de sodio [NaOH o drenaje limpio]). La reacción sólo produce biodiesel y una menor cantidad de glicerol o glicerina. 
Los costos de los materiales necesarios para la reacción son los costos asociados con la producción de aceite de semillas de cáñamo, el costo de metanol y NaOH al. En los casos en que se utiliza aceite vegetal usado, o WVO, el costo del petróleo es, por supuesto, gratis. Por lo general los costos de metanol cerca de $ 2 por galón y NaOH cuesta alrededor de $ 5 por 500 gramos o alrededor de 0,01 dólares por gramo. Para un típico lote de 17 galones de biodiesel, que empezaría con 14 galones de aceite de semilla de cáñamo, añadir que el 15% en volumen de alcohol (o 2.1 galones) y 500 g de NaOH. El proceso toma alrededor de 2 horas para completar y requiere alrededor de 2000 vatios de energía. Eso equivale a alrededor de 2kw/hr o alrededor de $ 0,10 de la energía (suponiendo que $ 0.05 por kw / h). Por lo que el costo total por cada galón de biodiesel es de $? (Aceite) + 2.1 x $ 2 (metanol) + $ 5 (NaOH) + $ 0.10 (energía) / 14 galones = 0,66 dólares por galón, más el costo del petróleo. [v] Otros costos puede incluyen las ventas, transporte, mantenimiento, amortización, seguros y mano de obra. 


El cáñamo de celulosa para etanol

Otro método implica la conversión de la celulosa en etanol, que se puede hacer de varias maneras, incluyendo la gasificación, hidrólisis ácida y una tecnología que utiliza enzimas diseñadas para convertir la celulosa en glucosa, que se fermenta para producir alcohol. Otro enfoque utilizando enzimas convertir la celulosa directamente al alcohol, lo que conduce a importantes ahorros de costes de proceso.
Los gastos corrientes asociados a estos procesos de conversión son de $ 1.37 [vi] por galón de combustible que se produce, más el costo de la materia prima. De estos $ 1,37, los costos de las enzimas son alrededor de $ 0.50 por galón, los actuales esfuerzos de investigación están dirigidas hacia la reducción de esta cantidad a $ 0.05 por galón. Hay un crédito fiscal federal de $ 0.54 por galón y una serie de otros incentivos disponibles. Las tasas de conversión varían desde un mínimo de 25-30 litros por tonelada de biomasa de 100 galones por tonelada utilizando la última tecnología.
En 1998 la demanda total de gasolina de California fue de 14 mil millones de galones. Cuando el etanol se utiliza para reemplazar el MTBE como oxigenante, esto creará una demanda de California en más de 700 millones de galones por año. El MTBE es que eliminarse gradualmente su uso en 2003 de acuerdo con la ley estatal.
En este caso se puede considerar la producción de biomasa a partir de una perspectiva mucho más amplia. Fuentes de materia prima en la consideración de estos procesos son los siguientes:
 
Nos ocuparemos de estas, a su vez y demostrar por qué uno de los cultivos dedicados a fines energéticos tiene un potencial importante para la producción de etanol en California, ¿por qué el cáñamo es un buen candidato como un cultivo energético dedicado, y cómo se puede representar el mejor camino de alcanzar el 34% de etanol próximos California la demanda del mercado de al menos 580-750 million galones por año. [vii]

Bosque Adelgazamiento y Slash, Mill Residuos

A 1999 la Comisión de Energía de California biomasa evaluación de los recursos estimados 13,8 millones de toneladas de hueso seco (5,5 Mill, 4.5 Tala y raleos 3.8) están disponibles en California.
Si se practica dentro de las regulaciones estatales y federales, el uso de esta fuente puede tener efectos beneficiosos significativos. La eliminación de exceso de biomasa de los bosques reduce la frecuencia y la intensidad de los incendios, ayudando a controlar la propagación de enfermedades, y contribuye a la salud de los bosques en general. En 59 a 66 galones por tonelada, esto podría suministrar hasta 900 millones de galones por año.
Una propuesta California proyecto , Mill Collins Pine Chester, lo que contribuirá de 20 mGy y ser colocado con una instalación de biomasa con motor generador de 12 MW de electricidad, sin embargo, existe una resistencia significativa a esos usos por varios grupos ambientalistas prominentes, y por buena razón – esto podría llegar a conducen a la destrucción generalizada del hábitat de los bosques por las compañías de energía exagerada dispuestos a ignorar el medio ambiente en nombre de la seguridad energética nacional. Las barreras incluyen también los costos de cosecha y las capacidades como algunos roza y aclareo son muy difíciles de acceso, y el alto contenido de lignina de estos materiales.
Si el 25% de los materiales disponibles se utilizaron unos 200 millones de galones por año se podrían producir.

De residuos agrícolas

En California, más de 500.000 hectáreas de arroz se cultivan cada año. Cada hectárea produce 1-2.5 toneladas de paja de arroz que se han quemado hasta ahora. Métodos alternativos de eliminación son necesarios, y la conversión a etanol ha estado en desarrollo durante varios años. Actualmente hay dos proyectos en marcha que propone utilizar la paja de arroz, uno en California (Gridley) y uno en Jennings, Louisiana. Si el proyecto Gridley se aplique plenamente, se añaden 25 millones de galones de producción a los ya delgados California 9 millones de galones por año. Las barreras incluyen gastos de recaudación y el alto contenido de sílice (13%) de paja de arroz.
Otros desechos agrícolas incluyen recortes de huerta, cáscaras de nuez y almendra, y los residuos de procesamiento de alimentos, para un total de alrededor de 700 potenciales MGy si todos los desechos agrícolas se utilizaron.Esto es, por supuesto, poco práctico, ya que algunos deben ser devueltos a la tierra de alguna manera, más los gastos de recogida y transporte tendrán un efecto sobre la viabilidad de un producto de desecho en particular. Los residuos agrícolas tienen el potencial para satisfacer una parte significativa de la demanda, con muchos factores a considerar cuando se propone una bio-refinería sobre la base de cualquier materia prima, que son determinados por completo análisis del ciclo vital.
Si el 25% de los materiales disponibles se utilizaron unos 175 millones de galones por año se podrían producir.

RSU (Residuos Sólidos Urbanos)

Aunque alrededor del 60% del flujo de residuos es un material celulósico, como restos de poda, residuos urbanos y el papel, esta fuente no se considera una opción viable para un número de razones, que incluyen las industrias existentes de que los materiales de reciclaje y el uso del vertedero de residuos verdes como “Alternativa Diario Cover” (ADC). La co-localización de la producción de etanol es posible, pero sólo hasta alrededor de 10 mGy de la producción. Cuando la inversión de capital se considera, en general se considera más económico de construir grandes instalaciones de capacidad.
El futuro de los RSU que se utilizará para la conversión de etanol no se ve bien. A lo sumo, 100 mGy de la capacidad puede llegar a entrar en línea, pero será una lucha cuesta arriba para competir con mayor valor ya utiliza en su lugar.


 
Los cultivos dedicados Energía

Hay 28 millones de acres de tierras agrícolas en California, de los cuales 10 millones de hectáreas son tierras de cultivo establecido. Si el 10% de este cultivo (1 millón de hectáreas) se dedica a la producción de cáñamo como la energía y el cultivo de fibra, que puede producir 150-500 million de galones de etanol por año.
Mayor estima que el resultado de ampliar el análisis para incluir el uso de las tierras agrícolas que actualmente no se aplica a la producción de cultivos, así como terrenos adicionales que actualmente no dedicados a la agricultura.Un Departamento de Agricultura y la Alimentación estimación sugiere que cada 1 millón de acres de producción de cultivos, que ocupan aproximadamente el 1% de la superficie del estado total de la tierra, sería el equivalente de suministro de etanol de aproximadamente el 3% de la demanda actual de gasolina de California. [viii]

Barreras

Un obstáculo para el desarrollo de una industria de la celulosa en etanol es la disponibilidad, consistencia y composición, y la ubicación de la materia prima. Cultivos específicos, tales como switchgrass [ix] , resolver estos problemas. Cannabis mejorará las oportunidades de negocio, ya que podemos “adaptar” las fracciones de la planta de cannabis para satisfacer fines múltiples usos, tales como compuestos de alto valor, papel fino, el fertilizante rico en nitrógeno, el CO 2 , medicamentos, plásticos, tejidos y polímeros – sólo una parte de la posible final de muchos usos.

Beneficios

Beneficios de un cultivo energético dedicado incluyen la consistencia del suministro de materia prima, el aumento de las oportunidades de co-producto, y el secuestro de carbono mayor. Se sostiene comúnmente que las industrias agrícola debe enfocarse en varios productos de valor agregado de las diversas fracciones de las plantas. Este valor añadido aumenta el desarrollo rural, proporcionando puestos de trabajo y facilidades para las operaciones de valor añadido. Cáñamo [x] se presta a esto de una manera única debido al alto valor de su fibra basta. Precios de mercado para bien limpia, compuesto de grado fibra natural son aproximadamente el 55 ¢ por libra ($ 1.100 por tonelada), inferior utiliza el valor, como en algunos de fabricación de papel, trae $ 400 – $ 700 por tonelada, mientras que otros de valor agregado opciones, como la fabricación de pulpa para papel fino [xi] , podría aumentar el valor de la fibra a $ 2.500 por tonelada.

El combustible y el método de la Compañía de fibra

El combustible y el método de la Compañía de fibra [xii] emplea una etapa de separación mecánica para extraer el alto valor del líber fibra [xiii] como un primer paso en el proceso. El material del núcleo que queda es someterse a la conversión al alcohol y otras co-productos. No hay flujo de residuos y el sistema proporcionará una reducción neta de carbono debido a la producción de biomasa aumentó. Eficiencia de conversión del núcleo de cáñamo es en relación con el contenido de lignina, celulosa y hemicelulosa y el método utilizado. La siguiente tabla muestra algunos de los materiales a menudo citado como fuentes potenciales de biomasa y su composición química. Un desafío es la conversión de la hemicelulosa de la glucosa, sin embargo, este reto se ha cumplido recientemente por Genencor, Arkenol, Iogen, y otros. Estas tecnologías proporcionan la conversión de las fracciones de la hemicelulosa y la celulosa en glucosa el uso de enzimas celulasas o ácido .
Cáñamo
Celulosa
Hemicelulosa
Lignina
Líber
64,8%
7,7%
4,3%
Núcleo
34,5%
17,8%
20,8%
Pino suave
44%
26%
27,8%
Picea
42%
27%
28,6%
Paja de trigo
34%
El 27,6%
18%
La paja de arroz
32,1%
24,0%
12,5%
Rastrojo de maíz
28%
28%
11%
El pasto switchgrass
32,5%
26,4%
17,8%
Composición química del cáñamo industrial, en comparación con la materia de otras plantas
Lignina siempre ha sido visto como un problema en el procesamiento de la fibra, y estudios detallados han revelado numerosos métodos de eliminación y degradación, normalmente se quema por el calor de proceso y generación de energía. Los avances en las tecnologías de gasificación y de la turbina permitirá en el sitio de alimentación y generación de calor, y deben ser consideradas seriamente en una propuesta a gran escala. Además, al análisis químico completo y una evaluación cuidadosa del mercado numerosos co-productos y oportunidades de valor añadido existentes. Ensayo debe incluir una NIRS (espectroscopia de reflectancia en el infrarrojo cerca) el análisis, con tantas variedades y condiciones de material como pueda ser recogida.
La reducción de la lignina alcanzado por las técnicas de cultivo y la cosecha, el desarrollo de germoplasma y el desarrollo de enzimas personalizados optimizar el proceso de producción y la eficiencia. Avances graduales en la eficiencia del sistema en relación con estas mejoras de producción crean un incentivo importante para los inversores financieros.
El sistema de la compañía de combustible y fibra de Recursos Renovables procesará 300.000 a 600.000 toneladas de biomasa por año, por cada instalación, el 25% a 35% de esto será de gran valor de los grados básicos libres de fibra basta. El restante 65% al 75% de la biomasa se ​​utiliza para el proceso de conversión. Cada instalación será procesar la entrada de 60.000 a 170.000 hectáreas. Las salidas son: Etanol: 10-25 mGy (millones de galones por año), Fibra: 67.000 a 167.000 toneladas por año, y otros co-productos, fertilizantes, piensos, etc que se determine. La producción de cáñamo tendrá un promedio de 3,9 toneladas por hectárea, con costos promedio de $ 520 por acre.

 

La biomasa de cáñamo de producción modelo con el combustible y el método de la Compañía de fibra [xiv]

Min
Max
Promedio
Mejorar un 20%
Totales
Vender un
Venta 2
Un total de 1
Un total de 2
Toneladas por hectárea
1.5
5
3.25
0.65
3.9
Lbs. Líber
(Separados por 90 a 94%)
750
2500
1625
325
1950
0.35
0.55
$ 682.50
$ 1,072.50
Lbs. Hurd
2250
7500
4875
975
5850
Galones por tonelada
20
80
50
$ 2.00
$ 3.00
Galones por acre
146
292,5
438,8
Los costos del etanol
Por galón
0.92
1.37
1.145
167.46
167.46
Etanol ganancias
$ 125.04
$ 271.29
Bruto
$ 807.54
$ 1,343.79
Costos de Producción
Por Acre
424
617
520,5
$ 520.50
$ 520.50
Los costos de separación
Por tonelada
41.54
75.68
58.61
$ 228.58
$ 228.58
Costos
$ 749.08
$ 749.08
Lucro
$ 58.46
$ 594.71
% De gastos administrativos y de licencia
2
$ 16.15
$ 26.88
NET
$ 42.31
$ 567.84
Capacidad
Acres
Toneladas de fibra
10 mGy Fondo
68.376
66.667
Anual
$ 2.893.256
$ 38.826.590
25 MGy Fondo
170940
166667
Beneficios
$ 7.233.141
$ 97.066.474
Administración total y Licencia
$ 1.104.333
$ 4.594.167
Los costos de capital no incluidos. Costos de capital estimados son de $ 135 a $ 150 millones por planta, más los pagos de los cultivos. Para agregar una operación de fabricación de pulpa requiere un adicional de $ 100 millones y agrega $ 117 por tonelada de fibra procesada de la pulpa, que tiene un valor de mercado de hasta 2.500 dólares por tonelada. Las estimaciones más conservadoras posible se utilizaron para este estudio. Un estudio de viabilidad a gran escala es necesaria para validar las hipótesis y proyecciones. Un adicional de $ 35 por tonelada beneficio de impacto ambiental también debe tenerse en cuenta en las proyecciones futuras [xv] .


Impacto económico

Empleo

De empleo para la producción de cáñamo, calculado a un trabajador por cada 40 acres cultivados [xvi] , se traduce en un total de 1.700 a 4.275 nuevos puestos de trabajo, si el 10% de las tierras de cultivo de California se pone en la producción de cáñamo cannabis. Estos trabajos se crean en todos los sectores del empleo agrícola tradicional, en el desarrollo completo del sistema.
Las plantas de procesamiento también creará nuevos puestos de trabajo en estas áreas [xvii] :
·       Las ventas y administrativos – de 15 a 25 por planta
·       Investigación y Desarrollo – 25 a 50 en todo el estado
·       Ingeniería y Técnica – 75 a 100 en todo el estado
·       Construcción y mantenimiento – 150 a 300 en todo el estado
·       Transporte y manipulación de materiales – 10 a 20 instalaciones por
·       General del Trabajo – 25 a 50 por planta

Construcción

Cada instalación incurrirá en $ 100-300 millones de dólares en costos de construcción. Gran parte del equipo y mano de obra se adquirirán a nivel local, la creación de nuevos empleos y oportunidades para los empresarios para proporcionar equipos y servicios para esta nueva industria.

Relacionados con las actividades agrícolas

A un costo promedio de $ 520 por hectárea, los rendimientos de los agricultores van desde $ 50 – $ 500 ganancia por hectárea. Utilizado en rotación con otros cultivos, el cáñamo puede ayudar a reducir el uso de herbicidas resulta en ahorros para el productor a la producción de otros cultivos de cáñamo.

Impacto Ambiental

Hay un gran número de impactos ambientales a ser considerados, incluyendo;
·       El uso del agua. Las operaciones agrícolas y de procesamiento se consumen cientos de millones de galones.
·       Grandes sistemas de monocultivo han sido problemáticos. Aunque el cáñamo se presta bien para el monocultivo, eficaz y viable esquemas de rotación debe ser concebido.
·       Organismos modificados genéticamente – son la clave para conversiones eficiente, pero puede representar una gran amenaza para la vida. Este es un tema que debe ser manejado con total transparencia e integridad.
·       Los flujos de residuos generados – Aunque espera que sea baja, una contabilidad detallada debe ser hecha y dirigida.
·       Creación de “sumidero de carbono” para absorber carbono
·       Mejorada de la tierra y la gestión del agua
·       En el Estado de producción de combustible – la reducción de los costes de transporte y los efectos asociados
·       Reducción de las emisiones (El uso continuado de RFG)
·       $ 35 por acre beneficio ambiental total



[I] de la Comunidad Power Corporation, 8420 S. Carretera División Continental, Littleton, CO 80127
[Ii] Para Corporación recursos en el futuro,! 909 Chowkeebin Corte, Tallahassee, Florida 32301
[Iii] Ontario Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimentación y Asuntos Rurales Hoja Informativa sobre “el cultivo de cáñamo industrial en Ontario” 08/00
[Iv] Un breve análisis de las características de cáñamo industrial (Cannabis sativa L.) de siembra en el norte de Ontario en 1998. 19 de mayo 1999 Hierbas A. Hinz, Tesis de Licenciatura, Universidad de Lakehead, Thunder Bay, Ontario
[V] IAN S. Watson, AIA BioDiesel expertos
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
[Vi] Cifar XIV Conferencia, “Cracking the Nut: lignocelulosa bioprocesamiento de productos renovables y la energía”, 04 de junio 2001
[Vii] Informe de la Comisión de Energía de California “COSTOS Y BENEFICIOS DE UNA INDUSTRIA DE PRODUCCIÓN DE BIOMASA PARA ETANOL EN CALIFORNIA”, de marzo de 2001
[Viii] Informe de la Comisión de Energía de California “EVALUACIÓN DE LA BIOMASA a etanol combustible potencial en California”, diciembre de 1999 pg iv 4.5
[Ix] El pasto switchgrass es el principal candidato bajo consideración por el DOE. Numerosos estudios están disponibles bajo petición.
[X] Cannabis Sativa, comúnmente conocida como “cáñamo” está incluido en una lista de cultivos considerados como posibles candidatos en Cultivos Energéticos de diciembre de 1999 de Energía de California informe de la Comisión “Evaluación de la biomasa en etanol combustible potencial en California” pg. IV-3
[Xi] pulpa de cáñamo y papel Producción Gertjan van Roekel jr.
ATO-DLO Agrotecnología, PO Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, Países Bajos
Van Roekel, GJ, 1994. Cáñamo producción de pulpa y papel. Revista de la Asociación Internacional de la Marihuana 1: 12-14.
[Xii] de combustible y la Compañía de fibra fue formado para promover un sistema de recursos renovables, el uso de cultivos fibrosos, como el cáñamo y el kenaf para producir fibra de alto valor natural, el etanol y otros co-productos. www.FuelandFiber.com
[Xiii] Todas las fibras de cáñamo, producido y vendido por Hempline (Www.hempline.com) está hecha de cáñamo cultivado sin pesticidas y elaborados sin productos químicos. La fibra es un uniforme de color natural dorado típico de los tallos de campo enriado. La fibra tiene una recuperación de humedad de 12% y la tenacidad de fibra de excelente. La fibra se prensa en fardos de alta compresión para reducir al mínimo los costos de transporte.
La fibra está disponible en 40 pies. y 20 pies contenedores, camiones o por la bala y se envían a nivel internacional. Las muestras de la fibra están disponibles para pruebas sobre la solicitud. El precio varía en función de la fibra de calidad, y tiene un costo comparable o más efectivo que muchas fibras naturales y sintéticas.
Fibra de cáñamo Hempline primaria viene en los siguientes grados:
Grado de fibra ultra limpio
·        99,9% del valor de limpia núcleo de la fibra: £ 0.55 +
·        El polvo extraído
·        Disponible en longitudes de grapas de 1 / 2 “a 6” y astilla.
·        Así se abrió con un negador del típico alimento básico de entre 15 a 65
·        Las aplicaciones incluyen: materiales no tejidos, materiales compuestos, textiles, en cualquier lugar que se necesita una fibra muy limpio y abierto con longitud de grapa uniforme.
Grado de fibra compuesta
·        96 a 99% del valor de limpia núcleo de la fibra: .35 – £ 0.55
·        El polvo extraído
·        Disponible en longitudes de grapas entre 1 “a 6”.
·        Bastante bien se abrió con un negador del típico alimento básico de entre 50 a 125
·        Las aplicaciones incluyen: una gama de compuestos, tales como muebles de automoción y construcción, telas sin tejer; aislamiento.
Uso General Grado de fibra de valor: £ 0.20
·        50 – 75% limpieza de la fibra de núcleo
·        Longitudes varían entre el 1 de primera necesidad “a 6”. Pueden ser modificados de acuerdo a sus necesidades
·        Las aplicaciones incluyen: la fibra de cobertura hidráulica, de cemento y relleno de yeso, aislamiento, geo-estera.
Núcleo de la fibra
Para cama de animales y el mantillo de jardín, bajo la HempChips ™ de la marca, está disponible en 3.2 cu. pies (90 L) comprimido a través de bolsas de tiendas y directa al estable-en cantidades camión.
[Xiv] En base a 20% de mejora de la producción canadiense de Ontario por el Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimentación y Asuntos Rurales Hoja Informativa “Creciendo cáñamo industrial en Ontario”, 08/00
[Xv] DOE cálculo – Ver Chariton Valley informes del proyecto.
[Xvi] Agrícolas de California Informe sobre el Empleo
[Xvii] Estimación solamente. Los números reales deben ser descubierto y confirmado.

Texto original en inglés:
Hemp Biomass for Energy
 Proponer una traducción mejor

Can Clean Energy Help Economic Recovery?

Bill Ritter, former Colorado Governor argues well but surprisingly enough the Clean Energy Investor does not. This debate is the epitome of why support for clean energy has been weak for the last 20 years.

Only now under Obama is there momentum gaining.

Both sides of this debate discuss the clean energy variable in the US economic recovery as it relates to GDP, some monolithic figure without considering the distribution of wealth within GDP in a clean energy economy versus one powered almost exclusively by OIL.

Clean energy will support the rise of individual and small business wealth as opposed to the giant monopolistic mega energy companies BP, Chevron, Shell, ExxonMobile, etc. Clean energy will support local community driven spending rather than concentrated wealth of a few individuals and companies far away from our neighborhoods.

Clipped from www.npr.org
NPR

Can Clean Energy Drive The Economic Recovery?

Two teams of experts face off over clean energy at an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate on March 8 at New York University's Skirball Center for the Performing Arts. From left: Bill Ritter, Kassia Yanosek, moderator John Donvan, Robert Bryce and Steven Hayward.

President Obama and other leaders have called for investment in cleaner energy sources as a way to create jobs and spur U.S. economic recovery.

But critics argue that alternative energy generally costs more than traditional fossil fuels and that demand for energy overall has fallen during the recession, making the energy sector an odd choice for stimulating a recovery.

The Intelligence Squared U.S. debate series recently pitted two teams of experts against each other over the motion “Clean Energy Can Drive America’s Economic Recovery.” They argued two against two in an Oxford-style debate.

Read more at www.npr.org